Discussion:
"Blade Runner"
(too old to reply)
Marv Soloff
2008-07-30 19:43:33 UTC
Permalink
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that. Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?

Marv
Flasherly
2008-07-30 20:00:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that. Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
Gaff: You are required to accompany me, sir."

Sushi-master: "he say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard."

Deckard: "Got the wrong guy, pal."

Gaff: "Horse dick! So you say. You are the Blade...Blade Runner."

Sushi-master: "Hey say you Blade Runner!"

Deckard: "Tell him I'm eating."

Gaff: "Captain Bryant ordered me to bring you in."

Deckard: "Bryant, huh?"

Gaff: "Yes."
Derek Janssen
2008-07-30 20:05:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flasherly
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that. Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
Gaff: You are required to accompany me, sir."
Sushi-master: "he say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard."
(Working knowledge of Hungarian, huh?--
We may be one geographical step closer to unraveling the linguistic
mysteries of the Rosetta Flasherly...)

Derek Janssen (my hovercraft is full of eels)
***@verizon.net
Flasherly
2008-07-30 21:52:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Derek Janssen
Post by Flasherly
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that. Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
Gaff: You are required to accompany me, sir."
Sushi-master: "he say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard."
(Working knowledge of Hungarian, huh?--
We may be one geographical step closer to unraveling the linguistic
mysteries of the Rosetta Flasherly...)
As many times I've watched that, it's certainly a comfortably intro.
Ford waiting on a sill reading a newspaper. I've been in bazaar
situations, though Turkey, the most recognized being the Covered
Bazaar in Istanbul. More along Roman coins among places not just
anyone might care to venture . Deckard calls it a mishmash of gutter-
speak, closer to the East, on a set design I'd suspect as much a
convenience from San Franciso's Chinese quarter. Also been in the Far
East, which is also perhaps truer for sidewalk peddlers working off
carts. Corundum -- primarily sapphires, some rubies, some gold. The
backdrop of storefronts, the gradated peddler shops a step above
bustling past crowded sidewalks, the gutter below literally transposes
for lack of concrete, which can vary from narrow open enclaves to a
few shop window with something in Sanskrit or Arabic someone with a
ponce composed. Invariably, best if all are treated for small enough
to require orienting oneself at the threshold, both overhead and
around, before entering to peruse the display. A discrete section for
a given city, of course, where the back roads to such recesses are to
be found. In Turkey, in Ankara's old sector, Ulus, Hassam's shop, the
genetic snake-dealer to undulating Zhora, might be a step too high for
prosperity and appearance for bartering with Roman coins unearthed by
farmers. Whereas in Bangkok, one might consider wearing sunglasses
before entering "too nice" a shop to ask for a dish of pigeon-blood
Ceylon rubies. One thing common to dusty unpaved back roads is a
profuse smell of exotic food wafting in preparation, that and a quick
eye for contingencies readily at hand. Never, ever wear red socks,
for instance, in Istanbul. And in Bangkok, don't talk too loud or
boisterously. Smiling often serves conversancy as well as anything
intelligible one imaginatively has else to say. And don't walk too
fast.
Adam Cameron
2008-07-31 08:11:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Derek Janssen
(Working knowledge of Hungarian, huh?--
We may be one geographical step closer to unraveling the linguistic
mysteries of the Rosetta Flasherly...)
Actually perhaps Flasherly writes his/her responses in some other language
and uses translate.google.com to convert them into English. That would
explain a lot.
--
Adam
Flasherly
2008-07-31 15:06:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam Cameron
Post by Derek Janssen
(Working knowledge of Hungarian, huh?--
We may be one geographical step closer to unraveling the linguistic
mysteries of the Rosetta Flasherly...)
Actually perhaps Flasherly writes his/her responses in some other language
and uses translate.google.com to convert them into English. That would
explain a lot.
--
Adam
Maybe it's a formal exercise in denial. Mind, not just another
obsequious ad hominem of ingenuous pattering, but a sincere thought
due weight ponderously first lends to delimiting the bastions of
axiomatic certainties. That whether help is to a sense more alike,
than not [apparent and real], as appertains to a tedium of androids
counting electronic sheep, all at your goodly leisure and some greater
discretion best to advise, but of course, my dear fellow.

--
Redmond Barry: Sir, ... I have a confession to make to you. I have
been put into your service by the Minister of Police... to serve as a
watch upon your... actions... and to give information to the same
quarter.
[Narrator: The Chevalier was as much affected as Barry at thus finding
one of his countrymen. For he too was an exile from home, and a
friendly voice, a look, brought the old country back to his memory
again.]
unglued
2008-07-31 17:52:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam Cameron
Post by Derek Janssen
(Working knowledge of Hungarian, huh?--
We may be one geographical step closer to unraveling the linguistic
mysteries of the Rosetta Flasherly...)
Actually perhaps Flasherly writes his/her responses in some other language
and uses translate.google.com to convert them into English.  That would
explain a lot.
I think it would require at least one more step, like English ->
Russian -> German -> English
Post by Adam Cameron
--
Adam
Marv Soloff
2008-07-30 20:28:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flasherly
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that. Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
Gaff: You are required to accompany me, sir."
Sushi-master: "he say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard."
Deckard: "Got the wrong guy, pal."
Gaff: "Horse dick! So you say. You are the Blade...Blade Runner."
Sushi-master: "Hey say you Blade Runner!"
Deckard: "Tell him I'm eating."
Gaff: "Captain Bryant ordered me to bring you in."
Deckard: "Bryant, huh?"
Gaff: "Yes."
As I recall, it was a bit more than that in 'cityspeak' Can you provide
the literal Hungarian translation. In the supplement disk, one of the
producers says that this sequence provides huge gales of laughter when
shown in Hungary or on Magyar TV.

Marv
Flasherly
2008-07-30 21:55:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marv Soloff
Post by Flasherly
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that. Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
Gaff: You are required to accompany me, sir."
Sushi-master: "he say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard."
Deckard: "Got the wrong guy, pal."
Gaff: "Horse dick! So you say. You are the Blade...Blade Runner."
Sushi-master: "Hey say you Blade Runner!"
Deckard: "Tell him I'm eating."
Gaff: "Captain Bryant ordered me to bring you in."
Deckard: "Bryant, huh?"
Gaff: "Yes."
As I recall, it was a bit more than that in 'cityspeak' Can you provide
the literal Hungarian translation. In the supplement disk, one of the
producers says that this sequence provides huge gales of laughter when
shown in Hungary or on Magyar TV.
Marv
Here's where I found it.

Off-World: City-speak is a simple forum for discussing Blade Runner.
http://scribble.com/cgi-bin/colloquy/colloquy2?which=br
Michael
2008-07-30 23:03:44 UTC
Permalink
A few years back they made an x-files episode from Norway, and when it was
shown on televsion everyone was absolutely shocked by how rediculous the
story was, and how awful the Norwegian dialect of the actors were. According
to the x-files, Norway has taverns were pirate like characters with parrots
on their shoulders, eye paches and wooden legs walk about frequently. And
they all talk about mythological figueres I would have to go to the library
to recognize. It's the same with Hungary, no doubt. But I can't remember
any foreign toungue from the movie, maybe it's just in the director's cut.
But i think I have seen that. Hmm
Post by Marv Soloff
Post by Flasherly
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that. Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
Gaff: You are required to accompany me, sir."
Sushi-master: "he say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard."
Deckard: "Got the wrong guy, pal."
Gaff: "Horse dick! So you say. You are the Blade...Blade Runner."
Sushi-master: "Hey say you Blade Runner!"
Deckard: "Tell him I'm eating."
Gaff: "Captain Bryant ordered me to bring you in."
Deckard: "Bryant, huh?"
Gaff: "Yes."
As I recall, it was a bit more than that in 'cityspeak' Can you provide
the literal Hungarian translation. In the supplement disk, one of the
producers says that this sequence provides huge gales of laughter when
shown in Hungary or on Magyar TV.
Marv
David Matthews
2008-07-31 00:25:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael
A few years back they made an x-files episode from Norway, and when it was
shown on televsion everyone was absolutely shocked by how rediculous the
story was, and how awful the Norwegian dialect of the actors were.
According to the x-files, Norway has taverns were pirate like characters
with parrots on their shoulders, eye paches and wooden legs walk about
frequently. And they all talk about mythological figueres I would have to
go to the library to recognize. It's the same with Hungary, no doubt. But
I can't remember any foreign toungue from the movie, maybe it's just in the
director's cut. But i think I have seen that. Hmm
I still have a tape of _Haakon Haakonsen (1990) _ called _ Shipwrecked _ in
the USA. I understand it's based on a quite famous children's pirate
adventure story - sort of a cross between _Treasure Island _ and _ Robinson
Crusoe _. Pretty good - I liked it.

Dave in Toronto


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Michael
2008-07-31 00:51:54 UTC
Permalink
It's made by Nils Gaup, our only good oscar nominee director in recent
years. He actually lives in the same part of the country as I. I used to
pass him in the street while he was waiting for the bus in the morning. I
would never i my wildest dreams dare talk to him or approach him though.
It's a very small country, I guess. Haven't seen him in a while though, and
I think he has moved away, either up north to Kautokeino where he is from or
down south to Oslo. Anyway, he always walks about town like a regular
person.
Post by David Matthews
Post by Michael
A few years back they made an x-files episode from Norway, and when it was
shown on televsion everyone was absolutely shocked by how rediculous the
story was, and how awful the Norwegian dialect of the actors were.
According to the x-files, Norway has taverns were pirate like characters
with parrots on their shoulders, eye paches and wooden legs walk about
frequently. And they all talk about mythological figueres I would have to
go to the library to recognize. It's the same with Hungary, no doubt. But
I can't remember any foreign toungue from the movie, maybe it's just in
the director's cut. But i think I have seen that. Hmm
I still have a tape of _Haakon Haakonsen (1990) _ called _ Shipwrecked _
in the USA. I understand it's based on a quite famous children's pirate
adventure story - sort of a cross between _Treasure Island _ and _
Robinson Crusoe _. Pretty good - I liked it.
Dave in Toronto
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unglued
2008-07-31 18:32:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael
A few years back they made an x-files episode from Norway, and when it was
shown on televsion everyone was absolutely shocked by how rediculous the
story was, and how awful the Norwegian dialect of the actors were. According
to the x-files, Norway has taverns were pirate like characters with parrots
on their shoulders, eye paches and wooden legs walk about frequently. And
they all talk about mythological figueres I would have to go to the library
to recognize.  It's the same with Hungary, no doubt. But I can't remember
any foreign toungue from the movie, maybe it's just in the director's cut.
No, it's in the original too, just checked, but Hungarian is just one
of many languages used in the film. You must have noticed they weren't
speaking English some of the time ? ;)
Post by Michael
But i think I have seen that. Hmm
Post by Marv Soloff
Post by Flasherly
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that.  Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
Gaff: You are required to accompany me, sir."
Sushi-master: "he say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard."
Deckard: "Got the wrong guy, pal."
Gaff: "Horse dick! So you say. You are the Blade...Blade Runner."
Sushi-master: "Hey say you Blade Runner!"
Deckard: "Tell him I'm eating."
Gaff: "Captain Bryant ordered me to bring you in."
Deckard: "Bryant, huh?"
Gaff: "Yes."
As I recall, it was a bit more than that in 'cityspeak' Can you provide
the literal Hungarian translation.  In the supplement disk, one of the
producers says that this sequence provides huge gales of laughter when
shown in Hungary or on Magyar TV.
Marv
unglued
2008-07-31 18:05:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marv Soloff
Post by Flasherly
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that.  Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
Gaff: You are required to accompany me, sir."
Sushi-master: "he say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard."
Deckard: "Got the wrong guy, pal."
Gaff: "Horse dick! So you say. You are the Blade...Blade Runner."
Sushi-master: "Hey say you Blade Runner!"
Deckard: "Tell him I'm eating."
Gaff: "Captain Bryant ordered me to bring you in."
Deckard: "Bryant, huh?"
Gaff: "Yes."
As I recall, it was a bit more than that in 'cityspeak' Can you provide
the literal Hungarian translation.  In the supplement disk, one of the
producers says that this sequence provides huge gales of laughter when
shown in Hungary or on Magyar TV.
Now that you mention it Gaffs speach does sound like it could be a
primitive form of Hungarian read by a Japanese who knows no Hungarian.
But in other scenes I've picked up snatches of German and Swedish so I
guess they let everyone on the set who was familiar with a foreign
language to pitch in.
Post by Marv Soloff
Marv
Flasherly
2008-08-01 01:09:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by unglued
Now that you mention it Gaffs speach does sound like it could be a
primitive form of Hungarian read by a Japanese who knows no Hungarian.
The enunciation of guttural sounds are from the Romance language of
Castilian Spanish. A straightforward enough sense in the reading apart
inferences of a primitive appearance as delivered by the son of a
father named Pedro, a Mexican immigrant residing in Los Angles.
Second only for a practical implication of Mandarin Chinese, its cast
holds truer to form than an iterative intent of Hittite permutations.

--
Programmars write code.
unglued
2008-08-01 07:06:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flasherly
Post by unglued
Now that you mention it Gaffs speach does sound like it could be a
primitive form of Hungarian read by a Japanese who knows no Hungarian.
The enunciation of guttural sounds are from the Romance language of
Castilian Spanish. A straightforward enough sense in the reading apart
inferences of a primitive appearance as delivered by the son of a
father named Pedro, a Mexican immigrant residing in Los Angles.
Second only for a practical implication of Mandarin Chinese, its cast
holds truer to form than an iterative intent of Hittite permutations.
I wasn' t aware that they spoke Castillian in Mexico or LosAngeles,
nor that Castillian had guttural noises and when push comes to shove
an attempt was made on the Hungarian tongue.
Post by Flasherly
--
Programmars write code.
unglued
2008-07-31 18:21:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marv Soloff
Post by Flasherly
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that.  Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
Gaff: You are required to accompany me, sir."
Sushi-master: "he say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard."
Deckard: "Got the wrong guy, pal."
Gaff: "Horse dick! So you say. You are the Blade...Blade Runner."
Sushi-master: "Hey say you Blade Runner!"
Deckard: "Tell him I'm eating."
Gaff: "Captain Bryant ordered me to bring you in."
Deckard: "Bryant, huh?"
Gaff: "Yes."
As I recall, it was a bit more than that in 'cityspeak' Can you provide
the literal Hungarian translation.  In the supplement disk, one of the
producers says that this sequence provides huge gales of laughter when
shown in Hungary or on Magyar TV.
Gaffs first comment sounds like:
"azonnal kövessen engem bitte!"

Which is "Immediately follow me" in Hungarian plus the German for
"please".
Post by Marv Soloff
Marv
T987654321
2008-07-30 22:24:18 UTC
Permalink
Of the three versions, I like the origional theatrical best. The
voice over make a confused situation more clear, and the ending is
much better.
g***@gmail.com
2020-03-16 01:02:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marv Soloff
On one of the anniversary companion disks to the final "Director's Cut"
of "Blade Runner", it appears that the 'cityspeak' used by Gaff (Olmos)
is basically Hungarian and 'unpolite' Hungarian at that. Can anyone on
the NG with a working knowledge of Hungarian (my skill at that language
is nil - although I spent considerable time in Budapest)verify this item?
Marv
https://screenrant.com/essential-movies-blade-runner-fans/

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