Discussion:
Fellini's greatest hits
Add Reply
unglued
2006-10-11 12:05:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Watching 8 1/2 the other evening reminded me that the parts of his
films that, for me, stand head and shoulders above the rest are the
scenes based more or less on his childhood and adolescence. Suppose one
were to pluck these raisins out of his films and edit them into one
semi-autobiographical super Fellini film and dump the rest. Would film
history be richer or poorer for it do you think ? Ok, it's not
applicable for all his films but say if one were to butcher 8 1/2 and
Roma and merge them with Amacord ?
Greg Bryant
2006-10-11 12:12:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by unglued
Watching 8 1/2 the other evening reminded me that the parts of his
films that, for me, stand head and shoulders above the rest are the
scenes based more or less on his childhood and adolescence. Suppose one
were to pluck these raisins out of his films and edit them into one
semi-autobiographical super Fellini film and dump the rest. Would film
history be richer or poorer for it do you think ? Ok, it's not
applicable for all his films but say if one were to butcher 8 1/2 and
Roma and merge them with Amacord ?
I'm still finding it very hard to get through a Fellini. I've walked out of
both 8-1/2 and La Dolce Vita. Did make it through Amarcord, but found it
kind of boring. I do have La Strada on the box, but I'm procrastinating on
it.

I even prepare for watching them by reading some reviews so I know what I
should be looking for.

Perhaps, it's just that Fellini and I don't connect. Not to say that I don't
like foreign films. I've seen quite of lot of Bergman, Kurosawa, etc. But
Fellini is not connecting with me.
Harkness
2006-10-11 13:03:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by unglued
Watching 8 1/2 the other evening reminded me that the parts of his
films that, for me, stand head and shoulders above the rest are the
scenes based more or less on his childhood and adolescence. Suppose one
were to pluck these raisins out of his films and edit them into one
semi-autobiographical super Fellini film and dump the rest. Would film
history be richer or poorer for it do you think ? Ok, it's not
applicable for all his films but say if one were to butcher 8 1/2 and
Roma and merge them with Amacord ?
I'm still finding it very hard to get through a Fellini. I've walked out of
both 8-1/2 and La Dolce Vita. Did make it through Amarcord, but found it
kind of boring. I do have La Strada on the box, but I'm procrastinating on
it.
I even prepare for watching them by reading some reviews so I know what I
should be looking for.
Perhaps, it's just that Fellini and I don't connect. Not to say that I don't
like foreign films. I've seen quite of lot of Bergman, Kurosawa, etc. But
Fellini is not connecting with me.
Aaaah, the old Bergman-Fellini split.

It's taken me a long time to appreciate Fellini -- I suspect it's
because there's not much difference between really great Fellini and
really bad Fellini, which often co-exist in the same film -- La Dolce
Vita has amazing things in it, but you couild take 45 minutes out of it
and it would improve the film...

John Harkness
Greg Bryant
2006-10-11 15:50:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Harkness
Aaaah, the old Bergman-Fellini split.
Didn't know that there was any sort of split between the two. I just find
Bergman much more accessible.

Just finished Antonioni's L'Avventura. It was accessible and I think I
picked up on the major themes. I just mention it since it was made in the
same period as La Dolce Vita and seemed to have the same sorts of
characters.
Harkness
2006-10-11 17:45:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by Harkness
Aaaah, the old Bergman-Fellini split.
Didn't know that there was any sort of split between the two. I just find
Bergman much more accessible.
There's no split between the two, but they are filmmakers for very
different sensiblities -- generally, I've found people are one or the
other. I'm certainly much more in the Bergman camp than the Fellini
camp.
Post by Greg Bryant
Just finished Antonioni's L'Avventura. It was accessible and I think I
picked up on the major themes. I just mention it since it was made in the
same period as La Dolce Vita and seemed to have the same sorts of
characters.
Yes, but Antonioni's sensibility is much more austere than Fellini.
Take God out of the equation, and Antonioni's much closer to Bergman
than Fellin. I think we can be reasonably sure that Michelangelo
didn't, deep in his heart, wish to be a circus ringmaster.

John Harkness
Greg Bryant
2006-10-11 18:09:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Harkness
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by Harkness
Aaaah, the old Bergman-Fellini split.
Didn't know that there was any sort of split between the two. I just find
Bergman much more accessible.
There's no split between the two, but they are filmmakers for very
different sensiblities -- generally, I've found people are one or the
other. I'm certainly much more in the Bergman camp than the Fellini
camp.
Sort of like Quentin Tarantino said, you're either an Elvis person or a
Beatles person.
Post by Harkness
Post by Greg Bryant
Just finished Antonioni's L'Avventura. It was accessible and I think I
picked up on the major themes. I just mention it since it was made in the
same period as La Dolce Vita and seemed to have the same sorts of
characters.
Yes, but Antonioni's sensibility is much more austere than Fellini.
Take God out of the equation, and Antonioni's much closer to Bergman
than Fellin. I think we can be reasonably sure that Michelangelo
didn't, deep in his heart, wish to be a circus ringmaster.
John Harkness
Both Fellini and Antonioni seemed to focus (at least in La Dolce Vita and
L'Avventura) on the idle rich. But the idle rich in L'Avventura seemed to be
grappling with emotions and connections, while the idle rich in La Dolce
Vita seemed to be doing nothing.
Harkness
2006-10-11 18:26:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by Harkness
There's no split between the two, but they are filmmakers for very
different sensiblities -- generally, I've found people are one or the
other. I'm certainly much more in the Bergman camp than the Fellini
camp.
Sort of like Quentin Tarantino said, you're either an Elvis person or a
Beatles person.
Tarantino, as is often the case, got that wrong, if you're quoting him
correctly.

You're either a Beatles person or a Stones person. Elvis don't even
enter into that equation.

John Harkness
Greg Bryant
2006-10-11 18:26:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Harkness
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by Harkness
There's no split between the two, but they are filmmakers for very
different sensiblities -- generally, I've found people are one or the
other. I'm certainly much more in the Bergman camp than the Fellini
camp.
Sort of like Quentin Tarantino said, you're either an Elvis person or a
Beatles person.
Tarantino, as is often the case, got that wrong, if you're quoting him
correctly.
You're either a Beatles person or a Stones person. Elvis don't even
enter into that equation.
John Harkness
Well, I am both a Beatles person and a Stones (60's incarnation) person. So
I think I will stick with the Beatles / Elvis split, because I'm a Beatles
person, but not an Elvis person.

I think he also said you're either a Coke Person or a Pepsi person. I'm a
Mountain Dew person. Go figure.
Sawfish
2006-10-12 21:41:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by Harkness
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by Harkness
Aaaah, the old Bergman-Fellini split.
Didn't know that there was any sort of split between the two. I just find
Bergman much more accessible.
There's no split between the two, but they are filmmakers for very
different sensiblities -- generally, I've found people are one or the
other. I'm certainly much more in the Bergman camp than the Fellini
camp.
Sort of like Quentin Tarantino said, you're either an Elvis person or a
Beatles person.
Post by Harkness
Post by Greg Bryant
Just finished Antonioni's L'Avventura. It was accessible and I think I
picked up on the major themes. I just mention it since it was made in the
same period as La Dolce Vita and seemed to have the same sorts of
characters.
Yes, but Antonioni's sensibility is much more austere than Fellini.
Take God out of the equation, and Antonioni's much closer to Bergman
than Fellin. I think we can be reasonably sure that Michelangelo
didn't, deep in his heart, wish to be a circus ringmaster.
John Harkness
Both Fellini and Antonioni seemed to focus (at least in La Dolce Vita and
L'Avventura) on the idle rich. But the idle rich in L'Avventura seemed to be
grappling with emotions and connections, while the idle rich in La Dolce
Vita seemed to be doing nothing.
...but indulging themselves with little restraint.
Sawfish
2006-10-12 21:40:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by Harkness
Aaaah, the old Bergman-Fellini split.
Didn't know that there was any sort of split between the two. I just find
Bergman much more accessible.
Just finished Antonioni's L'Avventura. It was accessible and I think I
picked up on the major themes. I just mention it since it was made in the
same period as La Dolce Vita and seemed to have the same sorts of
characters.
You're right about that, of course, but the defining difference is that in
8 1/2 you have a reverie of a very self-centered and self-indulgent main
character confrontingthe women in his life like a man in a cage with a
bunch of wild felines. Waering a toga, he subdues them (to a degree) with
a bull whip. The heroic confrontation is cast as a larger-than-life
silhouette on the wall...

I don't find anything like that in L'Avventura. No belly laughs, that I
can recall. You'll not come out of that film wondering about yourself--why
you laughed at the lion tamer, for example.
Aldo Pignotti
2006-10-11 13:31:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Bryant
I do have La Strada on the box, but I'm procrastinating on
it.
Check it out, it's not only my favorite Fellini movie, it's
one of my favorite movies period. The acting is just
amazing. I think it's Anthony Quinn's best movie.
unglued
2006-10-12 13:25:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by unglued
Watching 8 1/2 the other evening reminded me that the parts of his
films that, for me, stand head and shoulders above the rest are the
scenes based more or less on his childhood and adolescence. Suppose one
were to pluck these raisins out of his films and edit them into one
semi-autobiographical super Fellini film and dump the rest. Would film
history be richer or poorer for it do you think ? Ok, it's not
applicable for all his films but say if one were to butcher 8 1/2 and
Roma and merge them with Amacord ?
I'm still finding it very hard to get through a Fellini. I've walked out of
both 8-1/2 and La Dolce Vita. Did make it through Amarcord, but found it
kind of boring. I do have La Strada on the box, but I'm procrastinating on
it.
I even prepare for watching them by reading some reviews so I know what I
should be looking for.
Perhaps, it's just that Fellini and I don't connect. Not to say that I don't
like foreign films. I've seen quite of lot of Bergman, Kurosawa, etc. But
Fellini is not connecting with me.
I can understand that if you need to have a stringent narrative for a
film to be pleasurable.. Going back to 8 1/2 I thought the nightmare at
the begining and the rather hallucinatory introduction to the main
character at the spa afterwards were brilliant and the scenes with "La
Saraghina" dancing the Rhumba and the following scenes at the Catholic
school were priceless but the rest, with all it's "poor little rich
boy" problems, left me rather cold except for some fantastic
camerawork. I just watch Fellini's films rather as I would eat a box of
chocolates, pick out the best bits and don't mind the rest
Greg Bryant
2006-10-12 14:30:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by unglued
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by unglued
Watching 8 1/2 the other evening reminded me that the parts of his
films that, for me, stand head and shoulders above the rest are the
scenes based more or less on his childhood and adolescence. Suppose one
were to pluck these raisins out of his films and edit them into one
semi-autobiographical super Fellini film and dump the rest. Would film
history be richer or poorer for it do you think ? Ok, it's not
applicable for all his films but say if one were to butcher 8 1/2 and
Roma and merge them with Amacord ?
I'm still finding it very hard to get through a Fellini. I've walked out of
both 8-1/2 and La Dolce Vita. Did make it through Amarcord, but found it
kind of boring. I do have La Strada on the box, but I'm procrastinating on
it.
I even prepare for watching them by reading some reviews so I know what I
should be looking for.
Perhaps, it's just that Fellini and I don't connect. Not to say that I don't
like foreign films. I've seen quite of lot of Bergman, Kurosawa, etc. But
Fellini is not connecting with me.
I can understand that if you need to have a stringent narrative for a
film to be pleasurable.. Going back to 8 1/2 I thought the nightmare at
the begining and the rather hallucinatory introduction to the main
character at the spa afterwards were brilliant and the scenes with "La
Saraghina" dancing the Rhumba and the following scenes at the Catholic
school were priceless but the rest, with all it's "poor little rich
boy" problems, left me rather cold except for some fantastic
camerawork. I just watch Fellini's films rather as I would eat a box of
chocolates, pick out the best bits and don't mind the rest
Thanks, I think you've helped with an important realization for me, that I
tend to respond better to films with some form of narrative.

I think I have a harder time with films that lack some form of narrative.

Example, with L'Avventura, I think I was more interested in the mystery of
what happened to the missing woman (which was more or less the MacGuffin),
than I was about what that did to the two main characters and how they
responded to it and toward each other.
Sawfish
2006-10-12 21:31:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Bryant
Post by unglued
Watching 8 1/2 the other evening reminded me that the parts of his
films that, for me, stand head and shoulders above the rest are the
scenes based more or less on his childhood and adolescence. Suppose one
were to pluck these raisins out of his films and edit them into one
semi-autobiographical super Fellini film and dump the rest. Would film
history be richer or poorer for it do you think ? Ok, it's not
applicable for all his films but say if one were to butcher 8 1/2 and
Roma and merge them with Amacord ?
I'm still finding it very hard to get through a Fellini. I've walked out of
both 8-1/2 and La Dolce Vita. Did make it through Amarcord, but found it
kind of boring. I do have La Strada on the box, but I'm procrastinating on
it.
La Strada and Nights of Cabiria are very straigforward and they are more
like Bunuel (Verridia) than later Fellini. Fellini is more direct and
engaging than early Bunuel, in my opinion.

8 1/2 and La Dolce Vida are pretty demanding and you have to sorta like
what Fellini is saying before you can connect. Many people don't
necessarily connect with he's saying, so it is hard to get thru. (To me,
from La Dolce Vida on, solipcism is the only valid point of view.)
Post by Greg Bryant
I even prepare for watching them by reading some reviews so I know what I
should be looking for.
Perhaps, it's just that Fellini and I don't connect. Not to say that I don't
like foreign films. I've seen quite of lot of Bergman, Kurosawa, etc. But
Fellini is not connecting with me.
I think you have hit on this correctly.

To *really* like Fellini, you have to have a very, very crass streak. You
have to think that a retarded man sitting in a tree, peeing his pants, and
crying out for a sexual relationship--to a nun, fer chrissake--has comic
elements. A lot of this stuff is so painful that you have to laugh to deal
with it. But that kind of laugh is very purgative.
g***@gmail.com
2020-01-27 07:24:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by unglued
Watching 8 1/2 the other evening reminded me that the parts of his
films that, for me, stand head and shoulders above the rest are the
scenes based more or less on his childhood and adolescence. Suppose one
were to pluck these raisins out of his films and edit them into one
semi-autobiographical super Fellini film and dump the rest. Would film
history be richer or poorer for it do you think ? Ok, it's not
applicable for all his films but say if one were to butcher 8 1/2 and
Roma and merge them with Amacord ?
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/jan/02/all-federico-fellinis-films-ranked
JTEM
2020-01-28 18:55:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by unglued
Watching 8 1/2 the other evening reminded me that the parts of his
films that, for me, stand head and shoulders above the rest are the
scenes based more or less on his childhood and adolescence. Suppose one
were to pluck these raisins out of his films and edit them into one
semi-autobiographical super Fellini film and dump the rest. Would film
history be richer or poorer for it do you think ? Ok, it's not
applicable for all his films but say if one were to butcher 8 1/2 and
Roma and merge them with Amacord ?
Someone I once had *Enormous* respect for, but I would probably just
want to fuck today, loved Fellini... not sure why I'm saying this.

Actually, if you compare 8 1/2 to, say, All That Jazz, Hollywood beat
him, and did so my a ridiculously wide margin. Something to think
about.




-- --

https://jtem.tumblr.com/post/190488691573
william ahearn
2020-01-28 23:59:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JTEM
Actually, if you compare 8 1/2 to, say, All That Jazz, Hollywood beat
him, and did so my a ridiculously wide margin. Something to think
about.
Something to think about is how you could miss the boat by the entire ocean. What is ridiculous is even comparing these films -- two of my faves, btw.
william ahearn
2020-01-29 00:06:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by william ahearn
Post by JTEM
Actually, if you compare 8 1/2 to, say, All That Jazz, Hollywood beat
him, and did so my a ridiculously wide margin. Something to think
about.
Something to think about is how you could miss the boat by the entire ocean. What is ridiculous is even comparing these films -- two of my faves, btw.
And All That Jazz came 16 years later.

Loading...