Discussion:
Intolerance
(too old to reply)
David Oberman
2011-05-13 18:15:41 UTC
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"Intolerance" is highly regarded in the United States. But what is its reputation in Europe, in India, in Russia?

Have any of the great Asian directors ever spoken of it?
william
2011-05-13 22:08:10 UTC
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Post by David Oberman
"Intolerance" is highly regarded in the United States. But what is its reputation in Europe, in India, in Russia?
Have any of the great Asian directors ever spoken of it?
What did DW Griffith think of kimchee or noodles in peanut sauce? Did
John Simon or Pauline Kael make any mention of it?

William
Sol L. Siegel
2011-05-14 04:18:03 UTC
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Did John Simon or Pauline Kael make any mention of it?
It's been a very long time since I read the relevant article, but
Simon did mention it in a condescending way, something on the order
of calling Griffith's work baby steps on the way to the creation of
mature cinema. IIRC, Kael typically loved the messy, spasmodic
genius of it all.

- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
David O.
2011-05-14 17:44:06 UTC
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Post by Sol L. Siegel
Did John Simon or Pauline Kael make any mention of it?
It's been a very long time since I read the relevant article, but
Simon did mention it in a condescending way, something on the order
of calling Griffith's work baby steps on the way to the creation of
mature cinema. IIRC, Kael typically loved the messy, spasmodic
genius of it all.
Sol, I saw you on Facebook but I was afraid to send you a friend
request.
anthill
2011-05-14 18:03:45 UTC
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Post by David Oberman
"Intolerance" is highly regarded in the United States. But what is its reputation in Europe, in India, in Russia?
Have any of the great Asian directors ever spoken of it?
Didn't Taviani Brothers make a movie about it?

And maybe Metropolis(Lang) and Babel(Innaratu)owed something to it in
their cross-cutting between narratives.
anthill
2011-05-14 18:04:45 UTC
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Post by David Oberman
"Intolerance" is highly regarded in the United States. But what is its reputation in Europe, in India, in Russia?
Have any of the great Asian directors ever spoken of it?
Maybe 2001 owes something to it as well, going from 1,000,000 BC to
the future. There are many levels of reality and time in that movie.

I know Eisenstein learned a lot from Griffith who is generally
considered the single most important filmmaker in the world.
anthill
2011-05-14 18:05:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Oberman
"Intolerance" is highly regarded in the United States. But what is its reputation in Europe, in India, in Russia?
Have any of the great Asian directors ever spoken of it?
Personally, I was never much of a Griffith fan though I can understand
his importance. I would like to see a remake of Birth of a Nation
though.
gggg gggg
2021-08-01 04:44:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Oberman
"Intolerance" is highly regarded in the United States. But what is its reputation in Europe, in India, in Russia?
Have any of the great Asian directors ever spoken of it?
http://moviemezzanine.com/screen-writing-the-third-man/

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