Discussion:
Whipping Scenes in Movies
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n***@gmail.com
2013-09-08 08:34:39 UTC
Permalink
Hello all,
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
Oslo
inmate wrongfully punished
w***@gmail.com
2013-09-08 15:18:03 UTC
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Post by n***@gmail.com
inmate wrongfully punished
Marat/Sade
c***@windstream.net
2013-09-08 17:30:40 UTC
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Post by w***@gmail.com
Post by n***@gmail.com
inmate wrongfully punished
Marat/Sade
'Nicholas Nickleby' (2002) - revenge on the schoolmaster.
Bill Steele
2013-09-09 17:45:50 UTC
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Post by c***@windstream.net
Post by w***@gmail.com
Post by n***@gmail.com
inmate wrongfully punished
Marat/Sade
'Nicholas Nickleby' (2002) - revenge on the schoolmaster.
Fair Wind to Java
Return to Treasure Island
Hitler's Children

Not sure, but maybe The Black Swan (the old Pirate movie, not the ballet
thing)

It scares me that I can come up with these.
a***@yahoo.com
2013-09-08 17:30:08 UTC
Permalink
Hello all,
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
Oslo
Django Unchained
Robb Scott
2013-09-08 18:04:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Django Unchained
Roots.
Mack A. Damia
2013-09-08 18:07:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by n***@gmail.com
Hello all,
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
Oslo
inmate wrongfully punished
Any one of the "Mutiny on the Bounty" films.

There are hundreds of websites dealing with corporal punishment in the
movies.

If you can get a copy of the UK 1987 film, "The Happy Valley", there
are several brutal scenes of canings of Juanita Carberry - based on
her own memoirs in pre-World War II Kenya.

And now for us sadists in the group...........



--
OW
2013-09-09 23:15:46 UTC
Permalink
Hello all,
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
Oslo
Passion of the Christ.
trotsky
2013-09-10 12:36:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by OW
Hello all,
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
Oslo
Passion of the Christ.
...should've been called "Passion of the Whip". I'll throw one in: one
of Mario Bava's best movies:

"The Whip and the Body."
--
Never post something on the internet unless you have a point of
reference. You will look like a moron otherwise.
Halmyre
2013-09-10 06:43:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello all, I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.Oslo
High Plains Drifter
Zorro?
--
Halmyre
bermuda999
2013-09-10 11:48:31 UTC
Permalink
Hello all,
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
Oslo
Julie and Julia (2009)*


(limited primarily to egg whites and cream)
c***@windstream.net
2013-09-10 12:26:55 UTC
Permalink
I'm usually not one to whip and tell, but the 1962 film version of "Billy
Budd" ran into potential censorship problems because it had two whipping
scenes. Both were kept in the final release, albeit in tasteful
presentations.
One of them was classic, showing Robert Ryan's Claggart
enjoying a whipping, and being disappointed when it was over.
Mike O'Sullivan
2013-09-11 19:55:02 UTC
Permalink
HMS Defiant
Bastette
2013-09-13 02:42:21 UTC
Permalink
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
If (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063850/?ref_=fn_al_tt_6)


Bastette
Mack A. Damia
2013-09-13 03:16:27 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 13 Sep 2013 02:42:21 +0000 (UTC), Bastette
Post by Bastette
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
If (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063850/?ref_=fn_al_tt_6)
Not certain if the OP is looking for general corporal punishment
scenes or specifically those done with a whip. "If" is done with a
cane.

Another brutal caning scene occurs in "Another Country" - loosely
based on the young Guy Burgess ("Bennett" in the film) at an
Eton-esque public school.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086904/

Guy Burgess, Donald Maclean, Anthony Blunt and KIM PHILBY were members
of the spy ring who contributed to the Communist cause with the
transmission of secret Foreign Office and MI5 documents that described
NATO military and Marshall Plan economic strategy. They became known
as the "Cambridge Five" as they were recruited at the University of
Cambridge (Trinity College) during the 1930s. The identitiy of the
fifth man remains a mystery, although several names have been put
forth, the most likely of which is John Cairncross.

Blunt was knighted and became the Surveyor of the King's Pictures in
London, the art collection owned by the British royal family. So his
invovement in the spy-ring became somewhat of an embarrassment.
"Blunt: the Fourth Man" stars Ian Richardson as Blunt and Anthony
Hopkins as Burgess. Most if not all of the spy ring engaged in
homosexual activity - passions picked up in public school.

KIM PHILBY was also the role model for Graham Greene's character in
"The Third Man" - Harry Lime, although it must be pointed put that
this is hotly disputed by a nobody-nerd from Nowhere, New York.

--
w***@gmail.com
2013-09-13 03:30:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
KIM PHILBY was also the role model for Graham Greene's character in
"The Third Man" - Harry Lime, although it must be pointed put that
this is hotly disputed by a nobody-nerd from Nowhere, New York.
This is why you're an asshole. Your head is so filled with your delusions that nothing can penetrate the black-hole of trivia. I don't depute the idea -- although you citing an article that suggested Graham Greene wrote The Third Man to warn Philby is absolutely ridiculous -- although I seriously doubt it. Ultimately, the notion is irrelevant to the film and you are one of the insidiously stupid people that believes that accepting this trivia leads to some greater knowledge of the film. That being referential is a sign of intelligence and insight when in fact all it amounts to is a distraction with little or no value. It's similar to people referring to Orson Welles' cuckoo clock speech as the height of the movie even though Welles stole the speech and the Swiss didn't invent the cuckoo clock, the Germans did. Sometimes the hardest part of watching a film for what it is, is getting all the bullshit out of your head so you can just watch the film. That would never occur to a dimwitted knucklehead like yourself because you want to prattle on about trivia because I haven't seen a single interesting insight you've had about a film in all the years that I've been here.
c***@windstream.net
2013-09-13 03:59:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Another brutal caning scene occurs in "Another Country" - loosely
based on the young Guy Burgess ("Bennett" in the film) at an
Eton-esque public school.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086904/
I've seen that movie within the past year. The caning
wasn't especiually brutal physically, but the guy was
humiliated by it because he had been well in control
up to that point and had avoided such punishments because
he knew what was going on among the people trying to get
him. But he submitted to the caning in order to protect
someone he was in love with, and those administering the
caning knew that that was how they got him.
Mack A. Damia
2013-09-13 04:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@windstream.net
Post by Mack A. Damia
Another brutal caning scene occurs in "Another Country" - loosely
based on the young Guy Burgess ("Bennett" in the film) at an
Eton-esque public school.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086904/
I've seen that movie within the past year. The caning
wasn't especiually brutal physically, but the guy was
humiliated by it because he had been well in control
up to that point and had avoided such punishments because
he knew what was going on among the people trying to get
him. But he submitted to the caning in order to protect
someone he was in love with, and those administering the
caning knew that that was how they got him.
Our definition of "brutal" is different. Haven't seen the film for
over ten years, but I seem to recall that it was a run-and-cane with
full-force, and Bennett could hardly walk after the caning.

British public schools not only bred homosexuality but sadism and
masochism as well.

Judge for yourself. Starts about 3:15. (poor quality video)



Also, if the OP puts "whipping" in the YouTube search window, he will
be rewarded.

--
Bastette
2013-09-14 00:45:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Fri, 13 Sep 2013 02:42:21 +0000 (UTC), Bastette
Post by Bastette
If (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063850/?ref_=fn_al_tt_6)
Not certain if the OP is looking for general corporal punishment
scenes or specifically those done with a whip. "If" is done with a
cane.
I'll take your word for that as I've only seen the movie once, and that
was 40 years ago.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Another brutal caning scene occurs in "Another Country" - loosely
based on the young Guy Burgess ("Bennett" in the film) at an
Eton-esque public school.
Oh, that's the film I was trying to remember. I knew there was another
boys' school story with a serious corporal punishment scene. Yesterday I
got it into my head that the movie I was thinking of was "School Ties",
which I watched last night. There was a lot of fighting (between students)
but no whips or canes. Lots of actors who later became famous, though.

Bastette
Mack A. Damia
2013-09-14 21:07:05 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 12 Sep 2013 20:16:27 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
KIM PHILBY was also the role model for Graham Greene's character in
"The Third Man" - Harry Lime, although it must be pointed put that
this is hotly disputed by a nobody-nerd from Nowhere, New York.
Then Willy burped.....

This is why you're an asshole. Your head is so filled with your
delusions that nothing can penetrate the black-hole of trivia. I don't
depute the idea -- although you citing an article that suggested
Graham Greene wrote The Third Man to warn Philby is absolutely
ridiculous -- although I seriously doubt it. Ultimately, the notion is
irrelevant to the film and you are one of the insidiously stupid
people that believes that accepting this trivia leads to some greater
knowledge of the film. That being referential is a sign of
intelligence and insight when in fact all it amounts to is a
distraction with little or no value. It's similar to people referring
to Orson Welles' cuckoo clock speech as the height of the movie even
though Welles stole the speech and the Swiss didn't invent the cuckoo
clock, the Germans did. Sometimes the hardest part of watching a film
for what it is, is getting all the bullshit out of your head so you
can just watch the film. That would never occur to a dimwitted
knucklehead like yourself because you want to prattle on about trivia
because I haven't seen a single interesting insight you've had about a
film in all the years that I've been here.
************************************


1. I never claimed that Greene wrote the article to warn Philby. I
posted the article as a reference to the fact that Harry Lime was
modeled after Kim Philby. Your suggestion is typical of your abstruse
way of reasoning; that is, to twist everything around and point out
irrelevant details to bolster your lack of insight.

2. I wrote somewhere else that Welles was not the originator of the
cuckoo clock speech. You haven't been paying attention - which is one
of your BIG problems in life. Everything is about YOU!

3. Nothing I have posted is irrelevant to the discussion - except in
the mind of a dim-witted, paranoid prat such as yourself. Trivia
exists - and is just as much a part of a film's discussion as anything
else. Lordy, you are a hopeless twerp!

--
c***@windstream.net
2013-09-14 23:59:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
2. I wrote somewhere else that Welles was not the originator of the
cuckoo clock speech. You haven't been paying attention - which is one
of your BIG problems in life. Everything is about YOU!
Aside from your accurate perceptions of William, it should
be pointed out that the 'cuckoo clock speech' was not really
about who invented it, but about the fact that collectivists
don't accomplish nearly as much as individuals. In the
dystopian world of the book 'Anthem' there is a similar reference
to "the twenty illustrious men who had invented the candle."
Mack A. Damia
2013-09-15 00:22:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@windstream.net
Post by Mack A. Damia
2. I wrote somewhere else that Welles was not the originator of the
cuckoo clock speech. You haven't been paying attention - which is one
of your BIG problems in life. Everything is about YOU!
Aside from your accurate perceptions of William, it should
be pointed out that the 'cuckoo clock speech' was not really
about who invented it, but about the fact that collectivists
don't accomplish nearly as much as individuals. In the
dystopian world of the book 'Anthem' there is a similar reference
to "the twenty illustrious men who had invented the candle."
I propose that it is more along the lines of "uncertaintly" versus
"certainty". Uncertainty breeds revolution, creativity and innovation
whereas certainty breeds apathy and complacency.

Anyway, that's how I read the speech.

--
c***@windstream.net
2013-09-15 01:04:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by c***@windstream.net
Post by Mack A. Damia
2. I wrote somewhere else that Welles was not the originator of the
cuckoo clock speech. You haven't been paying attention - which is one
of your BIG problems in life. Everything is about YOU!
Aside from your accurate perceptions of William, it should
be pointed out that the 'cuckoo clock speech' was not really
about who invented it, but about the fact that collectivists
don't accomplish nearly as much as individuals. In the
dystopian world of the book 'Anthem' there is a similar reference
to "the twenty illustrious men who had invented the candle."
I propose that it is more along the lines of "uncertaintly" versus
"certainty". Uncertainty breeds revolution, creativity and innovation
whereas certainty breeds apathy and complacency.
Anyway, that's how I read the speech.
On the surface, the speech was about democracy vs.
other forms of governing, and democracy loses. I
don't see how you get 'certainty vs. uncertainty'
out of it. Here is Lime's actual speech:

"Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. So long Holly."
Mack A. Damia
2013-09-15 01:13:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@windstream.net
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by c***@windstream.net
Post by Mack A. Damia
2. I wrote somewhere else that Welles was not the originator of the
cuckoo clock speech. You haven't been paying attention - which is one
of your BIG problems in life. Everything is about YOU!
Aside from your accurate perceptions of William, it should
be pointed out that the 'cuckoo clock speech' was not really
about who invented it, but about the fact that collectivists
don't accomplish nearly as much as individuals. In the
dystopian world of the book 'Anthem' there is a similar reference
to "the twenty illustrious men who had invented the candle."
I propose that it is more along the lines of "uncertaintly" versus
"certainty". Uncertainty breeds revolution, creativity and innovation
whereas certainty breeds apathy and complacency.
Anyway, that's how I read the speech.
On the surface, the speech was about democracy vs.
other forms of governing, and democracy loses. I
don't see how you get 'certainty vs. uncertainty'
"Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for
30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed,
but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance.
In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy
and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. So long Holly."
"Warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed" spawns "uncertainty" among
the people, while "brotherly love"......"500 years of democracy and
peace" fosters certainty, don't you think?

--
c***@windstream.net
2013-09-15 01:33:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by c***@windstream.net
Post by Mack A. Damia
... the 'cuckoo clock speech' was not really
about who invented it, but about the fact that collectivists
don't accomplish nearly as much as individuals. In the
dystopian world of the book 'Anthem' there is a similar reference
to "the twenty illustrious men who had invented the candle."
I propose that it is more along the lines of "uncertaintly" versus
"certainty". Uncertainty breeds revolution, creativity and innovation
whereas certainty breeds apathy and complacency.
Anyway, that's how I read the speech.
On the surface, the speech was about democracy vs.
other forms of governing, and democracy loses. I
don't see how you get 'certainty vs. uncertainty'
"Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for
30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed,
but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance.
In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy
and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. So long Holly."
"Warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed" spawns "uncertainty" among
the people, while "brotherly love"......"500 years of democracy and
peace" fosters certainty, don't you think?
I suppose so, but I'm not convinced that warfare, terror, murder,
and bloodshed are what lead to great works such as those of
Michelangelo and Leonardo.

I don't know where inventive and creative impulses
come from, however, but it seems to me that they
come more from concentrated sources than from diffuse
ones. You might write a great book, or your wife
might do so, but it seems much less likely that you
and she will write a great book together.
Mack A. Damia
2013-09-15 01:53:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@windstream.net
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by c***@windstream.net
Post by Mack A. Damia
... the 'cuckoo clock speech' was not really
about who invented it, but about the fact that collectivists
don't accomplish nearly as much as individuals. In the
dystopian world of the book 'Anthem' there is a similar reference
to "the twenty illustrious men who had invented the candle."
I propose that it is more along the lines of "uncertaintly" versus
"certainty". Uncertainty breeds revolution, creativity and innovation
whereas certainty breeds apathy and complacency.
Anyway, that's how I read the speech.
On the surface, the speech was about democracy vs.
other forms of governing, and democracy loses. I
don't see how you get 'certainty vs. uncertainty'
"Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for
30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed,
but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance.
In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy
and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. So long Holly."
"Warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed" spawns "uncertainty" among
the people, while "brotherly love"......"500 years of democracy and
peace" fosters certainty, don't you think?
I suppose so, but I'm not convinced that warfare, terror, murder,
and bloodshed are what lead to great works such as those of
Michelangelo and Leonardo.
It's the uncertainty that stimulates innovation, creativity and
revolution. This is what Harry is talking about - the present
situation re: post World War II and in Vienna with the four powers
sharing control - the uncertainty of life and what would happen.
Post by c***@windstream.net
I don't know where inventive and creative impulses
come from, however, but it seems to me that they
come more from concentrated sources than from diffuse
ones. You might write a great book, or your wife
might do so, but it seems much less likely that you
and she will write a great book together.
It's the "zeitgeist" - the spirit of the time. If you are not safe in
your own home, for instance, you are more likely to find ways of
making yourself safe - innovation and creativity. If you don't get
enough food to sustain you and your loved ones, you are apt to find
creative ways to get food, eh? Of course, Michaelangelo and Da Vinci
had enormous talent to begin with, but the "temper-of-the times"
brought out the very best in them.

Dr. Victor Frankl did not express his true creativity and genius until
he had experienced a Nazi concentration camp (Auschwitz) as an inmate.

--
l***@gmail.com
2020-01-17 19:37:58 UTC
Permalink
There is a
weary flake
2020-01-17 20:28:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@gmail.com
There is a
There is a whipping scene in the comedy Take The Money
And Run (1969), a shadow is brutally whipped.
Your Name
2020-01-17 20:47:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by weary flake
Post by l***@gmail.com
There is a
There is a whipping scene in the comedy Take The Money
And Run (1969), a shadow is brutally whipped.
There whipping scenes in some diner and cooking movies ... the humanity
of all that cream being whipped to within an inch of their lives is
disgusting. The censor people should be doing something about it. ;-)
Joan in GB-W
2013-09-13 16:31:11 UTC
Permalink
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
If (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063850/?ref_=fn_al_tt_6)


Bastette

==============================

I don't know if anyone mentioned this film, but in the movie "Lady Jane"
Jane was brutally whipped by her mother.
Mack A. Damia
2013-09-13 16:44:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bastette
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
If (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063850/?ref_=fn_al_tt_6)
Bastette
==============================
I don't know if anyone mentioned this film, but in the movie "Lady Jane"
Jane was brutally whipped by her mother.
Don't forget (sore) "Fanny and Alexander".

--
don Gabacho
2013-09-13 14:19:09 UTC
Permalink
If Dana's Two Years Before The Mast was ever made into a film, its whipping scene would rate high. Not, as written by the author, for its goriness, rather than the platform it provided Dana for describing the greatest just cause for revolution ever written.
w***@gmail.com
2013-09-13 14:26:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by don Gabacho
If Dana's Two Years Before The Mast was ever made into a film, its whipping scene would rate high. Not, as written by the author, for its goriness, rather than the platform it provided Dana for describing the greatest just cause for revolution ever written.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0039056/combined
Halmyre
2020-01-20 08:12:17 UTC
Permalink
Hello all,
I am once again asking for submissions of entries, pictures, and
whatever else you can think of for my Whipping Scenes in Movies web
site. The sit whould be up in a week or so, and I will make one final
announcement at that time. Thanks to those who have already submitted
entries. You know who you are and your input is greatly appreciated.
Oslo
"Buggery on the High Seas", starring Eric Johns and Chuck U Farley.
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