Discussion:
Your picks of the best use of a song in a film and why?
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Cliff Webster
2004-09-16 23:58:55 UTC
Permalink
What are your personal favorite picks of the best use/s of a song (be
it a ballad, pop, rock, techno, etc.) that's heard fully in a film and
please say why, for any choices named. Use of any song in a film's
end credits, is excluded.
Carol Shubert
2004-09-17 13:12:47 UTC
Permalink
"Cliff Webster" <***@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:***@posting.google.com...
: What are your personal favorite picks of the best use/s of a song (be
: it a ballad, pop, rock, techno, etc.) that's heard fully in a film and
: please say why, for any choices named. Use of any song in a film's
: end credits, is excluded.


This probably isn't the kind of answer you had in mind, but
to me the song "Cheek to Cheek" in The Green Mile feels
very poignant to me... the juxtaposition of poverty, morbidity
(and death row) next to the images of insouciant affluence
makes me cry every time. Maybe other songs could have
had a similar effect, but for some reason this Irving Berlin
tune packs an emotional wallop for me within this movie.
--
"I have never made but one prayer to God, a very short one:
'O Lord, make my enemies ridiculous.' And God granted it.
(~Voltaire)
--
Carol ~ Email: pleiades_fire at hotmaildotcom
Please visit my huge humor & parody webzine (updated
every other Friday): http://www.rainy-day-laughter.com
** New issue September 17**
Calvin Rice
2004-09-17 15:26:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cliff Webster
What are your personal favorite picks of the best use/s of a song (be
it a ballad, pop, rock, techno, etc.) that's heard fully in a film and
please say why, for any choices named. Use of any song in a film's
end credits, is excluded.
An obvious one is Que Sera Sera, in The Man Who Knew Too Much, but it's
too bad it had to be Doris Day singing it. The song had an important
function in the plot of the movie. The words were not important though.

Do Not Forsake Me, in High Noon. It highlights several scenes of the
movie, and in this case the words are a running commentary on the story.

Waltzing Matilda, in On the Beach. Most of the time it was just the
music, but it was heard once with words. Hearing it continually added
to the sense of isolation of the Australians in a dying world.

The German and French anthems in Casablanca, used to demonstrate the
deadly political tension in that time and place.

Without words, the relentless piano tune played by the child in The Bad Seed,
carried over to the movie's background music with chilling effect.

-cr
Carol Shubert
2004-09-17 15:52:00 UTC
Permalink
"Calvin Rice" <***@netscape.net> wrote in message news:***@posting.google.com...
<snip>
: Without words, the relentless piano tune played by the
: child in The Bad Seed, carried over to the movie's background
: music with chilling effect.
:
: -cr

Oh nooo, now you've done it. That's one of the most stick-in-
your-head kind of tunes that hangs around all day long... like
that schoolhouse song in The Birds. That's the real reason
they attacked the children.
--
"I have never made but one prayer to God, a very short one:
'O Lord, make my enemies ridiculous.' And God granted it.
(~Voltaire)
--
Carol ~ Email: pleiades_fire at hotmaildotcom
Please visit my huge humor & parody webzine (updated
every other Friday): http://www.rainy-day-laughter.com
** New edition September 17**
Stephen Cooke
2004-09-17 16:25:51 UTC
Permalink
Row Row Row Your Boat in Dirty Harry.

Well, it's one of the most psychotic uses of a song, anyway.

swac
Runner up: California Dreaming in Chungking Express, because now I never
need to hear that song again.
Joe McC
2004-09-17 16:53:58 UTC
Permalink
Johnny Cash & 'The Man Comes Around' over the opening credits of the Dawn of
the Dead remake.
Shouse
2004-09-17 14:26:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Calvin Rice
An obvious one is Que Sera Sera, in The Man Who Knew Too Much, but it's
too bad it had to be Doris Day singing it. The song had an important
function in the plot of the movie. The words were not important though.
Do Not Forsake Me, in High Noon. It highlights several scenes of the
movie, and in this case the words are a running commentary on the story.
Waltzing Matilda, in On the Beach. Most of the time it was just the
music, but it was heard once with words. Hearing it continually added
to the sense of isolation of the Australians in a dying world.
The German and French anthems in Casablanca, used to demonstrate the
deadly political tension in that time and place.
Without words, the relentless piano tune played by the child in The Bad Seed,
carried over to the movie's background music with chilling effect.
-cr
Those are all excellent choices. I was going to say "In a Gadda da Vita" in (I
think) "Manhunter." It's cheesy as hell, but pretty effective.

Another is The Mindbenders "It's Getting Harder" in "To Sir With Love." It's
the scene where "Miss Pam" symbolically seduces Sir into a rock & roll dance.

I also always kind of liked "This Old Man" in "Inn of the Sixth Happiness."
Calvin Rice
2004-09-18 17:42:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shouse
...
I also always kind of liked "This Old Man" in "Inn of the Sixth Happiness."
Yes indeed, and along the same lines, the troups whistling 'Colonel Bogey
March' in The Bridge on the River Kwai.

-cr
Calvin Rice
2004-09-18 17:45:23 UTC
Permalink
In my last post, it should be 'troops', not 'troups'. Sorry.

-cr
h***@brazee.net
2004-09-18 12:17:59 UTC
Permalink
Good choices.

Two drinking songs - one in Dr. Strangelove, and one in Das Boot.
Norma Bates
2004-09-18 18:55:25 UTC
Permalink
John Barry's theme from "Somewhere inTime."

Not just stirringly beautiful and haunting . . . but also gutsy, since
it competes for screen time with Rachmaninoff's "Variations on a Theme
of Paganini."
Peter Meilinger
2004-09-17 15:41:11 UTC
Permalink
"Puberty Love" in Attack Of The Killer Tomatoes.

Pete
David Matthews
2004-09-17 16:49:04 UTC
Permalink
"Moon River" from "Breakfast at Tiffany's" - I always think of Audrey
Hepburn when I hear it which is nice.

"Everybody's Talking" from "Midnight Cowboy" - The lyrics seem to sum up
New York somehow.

Dave in Toronto
jayembee
2004-09-18 00:03:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cliff Webster
What are your personal favorite picks of the best use/s
of a song (be it a ballad, pop, rock, techno, etc.) that's
heard fully in a film and please say why, for any choices named.
Enya's "Exile" in L.A. STORY, in the sequence where Harris's
life is changed by the weather for the second time. The lyrics
don't matter so much as the haunting vocal, which underscores
the magic of what's going on in the sequence.

The same is true, to a somewhat lesser degree, of Enya's "On
Your Shore" in another scene in the same film.

-- jayembee
Dgates
2004-09-18 02:02:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by jayembee
Post by Cliff Webster
What are your personal favorite picks of the best use/s
of a song (be it a ballad, pop, rock, techno, etc.) that's
heard fully in a film and please say why, for any choices named.
Enya's "Exile" in L.A. STORY, in the sequence where Harris's
life is changed by the weather for the second time. The lyrics
don't matter so much as the haunting vocal, which underscores
the magic of what's going on in the sequence.
Yes!
Post by jayembee
The same is true, to a somewhat lesser degree, of Enya's "On
Your Shore" in another scene in the same film.
Yes again!

I loved that movie, and it's now hard for me to separate how much of
my love for it stemmed directly from those two songs.
Jack Stalnaker
2004-09-18 16:56:49 UTC
Permalink
The Supremes doing "Surfer Boy" in 1965's "Beach Ball." Although it's not
one of the better Holland-Dozier-Holland tunes they recorded, it's the best
thing in an otherwise bland movie.

However, "Beach Ball" IS one of the better Aron Kinkaid movies, which
include "Spartacus" and "The Wasp Woman."


JCS


http://www.meekermuseum.com/
**************************************************************
The Meeker Museum is a nonprofit, nonexistent organization
dedicated to the pursuit of inner peace through movie stars.
Stephen Cooke
2004-09-19 04:00:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Stalnaker
The Supremes doing "Surfer Boy" in 1965's "Beach Ball." Although it's not
one of the better Holland-Dozier-Holland tunes they recorded, it's the best
thing in an otherwise bland movie.
Hey, what about the Walker Brothers?

swac
Goy Liath
2004-09-19 00:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cliff Webster
What are your personal favorite picks of the best use/s of a song (be
it a ballad, pop, rock, techno, etc.) that's heard fully in a film and
please say why, for any choices named. Use of any song in a film's
end credits, is excluded.
simon and garfinkel in graduate

any kusterica movie

song at end of nights at cabiria

ikiru

wild bunch with the mexican singing

mccabe and mrs miller

nashville

godfather wedding song.
gggg gggg
2021-03-12 05:42:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Goy Liath
Post by Cliff Webster
What are your personal favorite picks of the best use/s of a song (be
it a ballad, pop, rock, techno, etc.) that's heard fully in a film and
please say why, for any choices named. Use of any song in a film's
end credits, is excluded.
simon and garfinkel in graduate
any kusterica movie
song at end of nights at cabiria
ikiru
Theme song of IKIRU:

https://groups.google.com/g/sci.lang.japan/c/EDeDakPIHc8

Pam or C. Wayne Owens
2004-09-19 04:48:14 UTC
Permalink
"Que Sara Sara" in "The Man Who Knew Too Much."
"As Time Goes By" in "Casablanca"
The song from the watch in "For A Few Dollars More"
wayne
http://www.movieandtvnews.com/
Post by Cliff Webster
What are your personal favorite picks of the best use/s of a song (be
it a ballad, pop, rock, techno, etc.) that's heard fully in a film and
please say why, for any choices named. Use of any song in a film's
end credits, is excluded.
J***@webtv.net
2004-09-19 14:52:19 UTC
Permalink
The Life of Brian.... "Always look on the bright side of life".
..Also "Low rider" seemed to fit in perfectly with C & Cs: "Up in
Smoke". ...Jon
Wes Wildcat
2004-09-19 17:03:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by J***@webtv.net
The Life of Brian.... "Always look on the bright side of life".
..Also "Low rider" seemed to fit in perfectly with C & Cs: "Up in
Smoke". ...Jon
Flowers on the Wall from Pulp Fiction, when the lyrics come
up, "It's good to see you, I must go" At that moment
Marcellas is walking across the street in front of Butch, so
he guns the motor and runs over him.
frank habets
2004-09-19 21:47:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cliff Webster
What are your personal favorite picks of the best use/s of a song (be
it a ballad, pop, rock, techno, etc.) that's heard fully in a film and
please say why, for any choices named. Use of any song in a film's
end credits, is excluded.
A recent one that comes to mind is "Raindrops keep Falling on my Head" in
Spiderman 2.
Why? Twas just plain funny.
Avoid normal situations.
2004-09-28 04:19:51 UTC
Permalink
The children's tune in Argento's _Deep Red_. A wonderful example of how the
mundane can be made terrifying.

--
alt.flame Special Forces
"Sure I like it." -- John "I'm Gonna Put On... Mah Mah Mah Mah Mah Boogie
Shoes" Kerrens on disco, <1pa4d.1285$***@nasal.pacific.net.au>
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