Discussion:
"A Pictorial History of the Silent Screen" (1953) by Daniel Blum
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Lenona
2021-08-18 19:30:25 UTC
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Blum died in 1965. I have his 1958 B&W book of the Talkies; there were at least two updated editions of that one, after his death - I think the last one was in 1982. Anyway, I'd say the book of silent films is worthwhile too, if only to whet your appetite for those films that MAY not be lost by now. (Mind you, both books consist mostly of photos.)

APHOTSS goes back as far as 1908, but pages 7-9, with text, have a few earlier photos from Thomas Edison's movies, plus one from Melies' "A Trip to the Moon" (1902), and a few others. The text also quoted the press release for the 1907 Kalem version of "Ben Hur." (No stills, sadly.)

There are almost ten pages in the index, with tiny print. However, that includes people's names, not just film titles. (There are 324 pages before the index.) Ernst Lubitsch gets mentioned 12 times.

Here are some movies with still photos you can see in the book:

Alice in Wonderland
Anna Christie
Battling Butler
Camille
Cinderella
Cleopatra
Dante's Inferno
Don Juan
The Enchanted Cottage
Faust
Forbidden Paradise
Go West
The Great Gatsby
Hamlet (1915, plus the 1920 version, which is German - and Hamlet is a princess!)
Hiawatha
Irene
Ivanhoe
Jane Eyre
Last of the Mohicans
Little Lord Fauntleroy
The Little Princess
Little Women
Madame Butterfly
Peter Pan
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
Romeo and Juliet
Salome
Sappho
The Scarlet Letter
Sherlock, Jr.
Smilin' Through
Stella Dallas
Tabu
Tarzan of the Apes
Tess of the D'Ubervilles
Tess of the Storm Country
Trilby
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Vanity Fair
The Virgin Queen
The White Rose
The Wizard of Oz (1910 & 1924)
A Woman of Affairs
The Wood Nymph


Here are some that were NOT included, incredibly (I've seen 9 of them):

Babbitt
The Babes in the Woods
Becket
The Birds' Christmas Carol
The Cameraman
Casanova
The Iron Mask
La Belle Dame Sans Merci
Lady of the Lake
Lady Windermere's Fan
Lord Jim
The Magic Cloak of Oz
Master of the House
The Patchwork Girl of Oz
Peter the Great
The Rainbow
Rasputin (1929)
The Sea Waif
The Secret Garden
Seven Chances
The Sheik of Araby
The Silent Enemy
Silk Stockings
The Snow Maiden
The Snow Bride
The Spider and the Fly
Sweeney Todd
Ten Days That Shook the World
Tom Jones
William Tell


Lenona.
Lenona
2021-08-18 19:55:37 UTC
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Oh, yes - "Diary of a Lost Girl" somehow wasn't there, either!

But, it DID have:

Little Red Riding Hood
Nell Gwynn (with Dorothy Gish)
Sleeping Beauty
Snow White
The Wind (with Lillian Gish).
Manfred Polak
2021-08-18 21:13:50 UTC
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Post by Lenona
Hamlet (1915, plus the 1920 version, which is German - and Hamlet is a princess!)
It's an interesting film. Hamlet is played by Asta Nielsen, and she was
the producer, too. It is available on a German (but English-friendly)
DVD.

https://www.edition-filmmuseum.com/product_info.php/language/en/info/p69_Hamlet---Die-Filmprimadonna.html


Manfred
Lenona
2021-08-20 14:27:36 UTC
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Post by Manfred Polak
Hamlet is played by Asta Nielsen, and she was
the producer, too.
Born in Denmark in 1881, she died in 1972.

She starred in "Hedda Gabler," appeared with Greta Garbo in "The Joyless Street," and starred in the 1916 "Cinderella."

About that one:

"Growing up with mean foster parents, Lotte is employed as a kitchen maid with the von Harten family. After a dramatic interlude including accusation of theft, Mrs. von Harten reveals the truth about being her real mother and the two are reunited."

And, from one critic's review of "A Militant Suffragette" (German, 1913):

https://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/57873/four-films-with-asta-nielsen/

"Despite The Suffragette's strangely backward-looking conclusion (long story short: the suffragettes do not emerge victorious), it's actually a pleasant, efficiently paced drama with a diverting performance from Nielsen."

(German women won the right to vote five years later.)

Lenona.

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