Discussion:
Southpaw (2015)
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super70s
2021-03-21 00:56:01 UTC
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I was not a big fan of director Antoine Fuqua's 2004 treatment of the
fabled King Arthur (seemed like one long gory battle scene after
another) but he came up with a winner 11 years later with Southpaw, a
boxing yarn unlike most boxing yarns in that our hero starts out at the
top of his game with wealth and fame, suffers an unbearable personal
loss that sends his career spiraling downward, and redeems himself with
the help of the manager of a neighborhood training gym (Forest
Whitaker). The fight scenes are well done and realistic (something most
modern boxing films strive for but don't always achieve). Jake
Gyllenhaal shines in the lead with supporting roles by Rachel McAdams as
his loyal wife and Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson as his not always loyal
promoter in this well written (Kurt Sutter) movie.
moviePig
2021-03-21 02:04:07 UTC
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Post by super70s
I was not a big fan of director Antoine Fuqua's 2004 treatment of the
fabled King Arthur (seemed like one long gory battle scene after
another) but he came up with a winner 11 years later with Southpaw, a
boxing yarn unlike most boxing yarns in that our hero starts out at the
top of his game with wealth and fame, suffers an unbearable personal
loss that sends his career spiraling downward, and redeems himself with
the help of the manager of a neighborhood training gym (Forest
Whitaker). The fight scenes are well done and realistic (something most
modern boxing films strive for but don't always achieve). Jake
Gyllenhaal shines in the lead with supporting roles by Rachel McAdams as
his loyal wife and Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson as his not always loyal
promoter in this well written (Kurt Sutter) movie.
Looks plausible. Will check out...
wlah...@gmail.com
2021-03-23 03:22:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by super70s
I was not a big fan of director Antoine Fuqua's 2004 treatment of the
fabled King Arthur (seemed like one long gory battle scene after
another) but he came up with a winner 11 years later with Southpaw, a
boxing yarn unlike most boxing yarns in that our hero starts out at the
top of his game with wealth and fame, suffers an unbearable personal
loss that sends his career spiraling downward, and redeems himself with
the help of the manager of a neighborhood training gym (Forest
Whitaker). The fight scenes are well done and realistic (something most
modern boxing films strive for but don't always achieve). Jake
Gyllenhaal shines in the lead with supporting roles by Rachel McAdams as
his loyal wife and Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson as his not always loyal
promoter in this well written (Kurt Sutter) movie.
Looks plausible. Will check out...
I found it really hokey. Not "plausible" at all.

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