Discussion:
Turner Classic Movies adds 'sexist and racist content' warning to 18 movies, including Breakfast at Tiffany's, Psycho, Gone With the Wind and My Fair Lady
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super70s
2021-03-06 08:47:43 UTC
Permalink
more at
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9330825/TCM-examine-18-
problematic-classic-movies-new-series.html
*TCM is launching a new series called Reframed: Classic Films in the Rearview
Mirror to look at 'troubling and problematic' aspects of old Hollywood movies
*Every Thursday for the month of March, rotating hosts will hold roundtable
introductions about the history and context of the movie
*They will also warn viewers about depictions of racism, sexism LGBTQ issues.
*Among the 18 films that will be discussed include Breakfast at Tiffany's,
Psycho, Gone With the Wind, My Fair Lady, Stagecoach, The Jazz Singer and more
*Some racism issues that will be tackled include blackface routines and white
actors playing non-white roles
*The hosts will also discuss sexism in these movies, in which men seem to
physically or psyhcologically abuse women
Turner Classic Movies will hold a full roundtable discussion at the start of
several of old Hollywood's most celebrated films to warn viewers about 'sexist
and racist content' - prompting major mixed reaction from fans, with some
slamming 'sick' cancel culture.
On Thursday, the cable network kicked off Reframed: Classic Films in the
Rearview Mirror, a series where it says it examines the 'troubling and
problematic' aspects of the classics, which were released from the 1920s to the
1960s.
Among the 18 flicks under the microscope include Breakfast at
Tiffany's, Psycho,
Gone With the Wind, My Fair Lady, Stagecoach, The Jazz Singer, Seven Brides for
Seven Brothers and more.
Several hosts will take turns holding roundtable introductions before the start
of each movie where they will discuss the history and cultural context of the
movie.
They will also warn viewers who have never seen these films before about
potentially upsetting moments including depictions of racism, sexism, and LGBTQ
issues.
Among the problematic aspects will be white actors portraying non-white
roles or
donning blackface.
This includes Mickey Rooney's performance as Mr Yunioshi in Breakfast at
Tiffany's, Sam Jaffe playing the title role of Gunga Din, Al Jolson donning
blackface for The Jazz Singer.
HBO Max, the streaming service that airs TCM movies, has not said
whether or not
they will be pulling any of the films, or adding the roundtable discussion.
The announcement prompted major mixed raction from fans, with some
classic movie
fans saying Americans should 'speak of painful tradition. We aren't going to
1984 ourselves to a more just and equitable society'. Others said they'd had
enough of 'cancel culture'.
But some classics fans were in support of the discussions, with one saying: 'I
absolutely ADORE Breakfast at Tiffany's, but it has the most racist
portrayal of
an Asian character that I've ever seen. Good gracious.'
'We know millions of people love these films,' TCM host Jacqueline Stewart, who
is participating in many of the conversations, told the Associated Press.
'We're not saying this is how you should feel about Psycho or this is how you
should feel about 'Gone with the Wind.
'We're just trying to model ways of having longer and deeper conversations and
not just cutting it off to "I love this movie. I hate this movie". There's so
much space in between.'
Stewart, a University of Chicago professor who in 2019 became the channel's
first African American host, has spent her career studying classic films,
particularly those in the silent era, and black audiences
She knows first-hand the tension of loving films that also contain racial
stereotypes.
'I grew up in a family of people who loved classic films. Now, how can you love
these films if you know that there's going to be a maid or mammy that
shows up?'
Stewart said.
'Well, I grew up around people who could still love the movie. You appreciate
some parts of it. You critique other parts of it. That's something that one can
do and it actually can enrich your experience of the film.'
As well as discussing actors donning blackface, or white actors playing
non-white characters, the selections allow the hosts - Stewart, Ben Mankiewicz,
Dave Karger, Alicia Malone and Eddie Muller - to think about Hollywood films
more broadly, too.
For Psycho, the hosts talk about transgender identity in the film and the
implications of equating gender fluidity and dressing in women's clothes with
mental illness and violence.
It also sparks a bigger conversation about sexuality in Alfred Hitchcock films.
During the My Fair Lady conversation, they talk about why the film adaptation
has a less feminist ending than the stage play, and Henry Higgins' physical and
psychological abuse of Eliza Dolittle.
Not feeding her and stuffing marbles in her mouth are played for cute laughs in
the film. Is it a commentary on misogyny or just plain misogyny?
And on the night that Guess Who's Coming to Dinner will air, Stewart discusses
the complex legacy of actor Sidney Poitier, who plays a black man engaged to a
white woman, to the horror of her family.
'His career is so important for the ways that white Americans really started to
have more sympathy and understanding of black people,' Stewart said.
'But at the same time, there are aspects of his films that are clearly oriented
primarily to white audiences. That opens up all kinds of complications
for black
viewers who felt that he wasn't a representative of the race as a whole.'
Classics fans were quick to take to Twitter to voice their support over the
decision to host the roundtables, but others slammed it as 'cancel culture'.
racism. Don't
edit Gone with the Wind. Talk about slavery in the south. Don't remove black
face from Golden Girls. Speak of the painful tradition. We aren't going to 1984
ourselves out to a more just and equitable society.'
that nonsense after reading My Fair Lady is now "problematic". Like my mother
just said we need to drive the culture police crazy'.
'So TCM is "looking into" getting rid of 18 movies including Breakfast at
Tiffany's and My Fair Lady! All because they are not woke movies! Sick,' user
@Pensgirl84 tweeted.
saying: 'I love My Fair Lady but does anyone think My Fair Lady 'isnt'
troubling!?!'
@inb4den tweeted: 'I absolutely ADORE Breakfast at Tiffany's but it has
the most
racist portrayal of an Asian character that I've ever see. Good gracious'.
movie. 'I love Breakfast at Tiffany's, and if they just took out hte Rooney
scenes from teh movie, it wouldn't negatively impact the film at all.'
responded by sayind that Breakfast at Tiffany's is 'such a delightful
fun film -
except for the Mickey Rooney parts, which are so unnecessary, insulting and
unfunny. Roony was so charming in so many parts, hard to believe they did it!'
Companies have lately taken to adding disclaimers before shows and films
depicting outdated or stereotypical characters and themes.
And in some instances, films have just been made unavailable. Disney has said
that its 1946 film Song of the South will never be on Disney+.
Recently, it was revealed that Walt Disney Company holds monthly meetings with
advocates from women and minority groups who comb through hundreds of hours
of Disney-streamed content looking for potentially offensive material to flag.
The goal of Reframed Classics is to help give audiences the tools to discuss
films from a different era and not just dismiss or cancel them.
And Stewart, for her part, doesn't believe that you can simply remove
problematic films from the culture.
'I think there's something to be learned from any work of art,' Stewart said.
'They're all historical artifacts that tell us a lot about the industry
in which
they were made, the cultures that they were speaking to.'
Every Thursday, through March 25, four to five movies will be 'Reframed'
beginning at 8pm ET.
Good it's only through March 25, this could get old fast. I guess a
"full roundtable discussion" is going to take at least 15 min.

Some of those they mentioned I have no idea what could be "troubling
and problematic" about them but there must be something.
moviePig
2021-03-06 14:23:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by super70s
more at
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9330825/TCM-examine-18-
problematic-classic-movies-new-series.html
*TCM is launching a new series called Reframed: Classic Films in the Rearview
Mirror to look at 'troubling and problematic' aspects of old Hollywood movies
*Every Thursday for the month of March, rotating hosts will hold roundtable
introductions about the history and context of the movie
*They will also warn viewers about depictions of racism, sexism LGBTQ issues.
*Among the 18 films that will be discussed include Breakfast at Tiffany's,
Psycho, Gone With the Wind, My Fair Lady, Stagecoach, The Jazz Singer and more
*Some racism issues that will be tackled include blackface routines and white
actors playing non-white roles
*The hosts will also discuss sexism in these movies, in which men seem to
physically or psyhcologically abuse women
Turner Classic Movies will hold a full roundtable discussion at the start of
several of old Hollywood's most celebrated films to warn viewers about 'sexist
and racist content' - prompting major mixed reaction from fans, with some
slamming 'sick' cancel culture.
On Thursday, the cable network kicked off Reframed: Classic Films in the
Rearview Mirror, a series where it says it examines the 'troubling and
problematic' aspects of the classics, which were released from the 1920s to the
1960s.
Among the 18 flicks under the microscope include Breakfast at
Tiffany's, Psycho,
Gone With the Wind, My Fair Lady, Stagecoach, The Jazz Singer, Seven Brides for
Seven Brothers and more.
Several hosts will take turns holding roundtable introductions before the start
of each movie where they will discuss the history and cultural context of the
movie.
They will also warn viewers who have never seen these films before about
potentially upsetting moments including depictions of racism, sexism, and LGBTQ
issues.
Among the problematic aspects will be white actors portraying
non-white roles or
donning blackface.
This includes Mickey Rooney's performance as Mr Yunioshi in Breakfast at
Tiffany's, Sam Jaffe playing the title role of Gunga Din, Al Jolson donning
blackface for The Jazz Singer.
HBO Max, the streaming service that airs TCM movies, has not said
whether or not
they will be pulling any of the films, or adding the roundtable discussion.
The announcement prompted major mixed raction from fans, with some
classic movie
fans saying Americans should 'speak of painful tradition. We aren't going to
1984 ourselves to a more just and equitable society'.  Others said
they'd had
enough of 'cancel culture'.
But some classics fans were in support of the discussions, with one saying: 'I
absolutely ADORE Breakfast at Tiffany's, but it has the most racist
portrayal of
an Asian character that I've ever seen. Good gracious.'
'We know millions of people love these films,' TCM host Jacqueline Stewart, who
is participating in many of the conversations, told the Associated Press.
'We're not saying this is how you should feel about Psycho or this is how you
should feel about 'Gone with the Wind.
'We're just trying to model ways of having longer and deeper
conversations and
not just cutting it off to "I love this movie. I hate this movie". There's so
much space in between.'
Stewart, a University of Chicago professor who in 2019 became the channel's
first African American host, has spent her career studying classic films,
particularly those in the silent era, and black audiences
She knows first-hand the tension of loving films that also contain racial
stereotypes.
'I grew up in a family of people who loved classic films. Now, how can you love
these films if you know that there's going to be a maid or mammy that
shows up?'
Stewart said.
'Well, I grew up around people who could still love the movie. You appreciate
some parts of it. You critique other parts of it. That's something that one can
do and it actually can enrich your experience of the film.'
As well as discussing actors donning blackface, or white actors playing
non-white characters, the selections allow the hosts - Stewart, Ben Mankiewicz,
Dave Karger, Alicia Malone and Eddie Muller - to think about Hollywood films
more broadly, too.
For Psycho, the hosts talk about transgender identity in the film and the
implications of equating gender fluidity and dressing in women's clothes with
mental illness and violence.
It also sparks a bigger conversation about sexuality in Alfred Hitchcock films.
During the My Fair Lady conversation, they talk about why the film adaptation
has a less feminist ending than the stage play, and Henry Higgins' physical and
psychological abuse of Eliza Dolittle.
Not feeding her and stuffing marbles in her mouth are played for cute laughs in
the film. Is it a commentary on misogyny or just plain misogyny?
And on the night that Guess Who's Coming to Dinner will air, Stewart discusses
the complex legacy of actor Sidney Poitier, who plays a black man engaged to a
white woman, to the horror of her family.
'His career is so important for the ways that white Americans really started to
have more sympathy and understanding of black people,' Stewart said.
'But at the same time, there are aspects of his films that are clearly oriented
primarily to white audiences. That opens up all kinds of complications
for black
viewers who felt that he wasn't a representative of the race as a whole.'
Classics fans were quick to take to Twitter to voice their support over the
decision to host the roundtables, but others slammed it as 'cancel culture'.
racism. Don't
edit Gone with the Wind. Talk about slavery in the south. Don't remove black
face from Golden Girls. Speak of the painful tradition. We aren't going to 1984
ourselves out to a more just and equitable society.'
that nonsense after reading My Fair Lady is now "problematic". Like my mother
just said we need to drive the culture police crazy'.
'So TCM is "looking into" getting rid of 18 movies including Breakfast at
Tiffany's and My Fair Lady! All because they are not woke movies! Sick,' user
@Pensgirl84 tweeted.
saying: 'I love My Fair Lady but does anyone think My Fair Lady 'isnt'
troubling!?!'
@inb4den tweeted: 'I absolutely ADORE Breakfast at Tiffany's but it
has the most
racist portrayal of an Asian character that I've ever see. Good gracious'.
movie. 'I love Breakfast at Tiffany's, and if they just took out hte Rooney
scenes from teh movie, it wouldn't negatively impact the film at all.'
responded by sayind that Breakfast at Tiffany's is 'such a delightful
fun film -
except for the Mickey Rooney parts, which are so unnecessary,
insulting and
unfunny. Roony was so charming in so many parts, hard to believe they did it!'
Companies have lately taken to adding disclaimers before shows and films
depicting outdated or stereotypical characters and themes.
And in some instances, films have just been made unavailable. Disney has said
that its 1946 film Song of the South will never be on Disney+.
Recently, it was revealed that Walt Disney Company holds monthly meetings with
advocates from women and minority groups who comb through hundreds of hours
of Disney-streamed content looking for potentially offensive material to flag.
The goal of Reframed Classics is to help give audiences the tools to discuss
films from a different era and not just dismiss or cancel them.
And Stewart, for her part, doesn't believe that you can simply remove
problematic films from the culture.
'I think there's something to be learned from any work of art,' Stewart said.
'They're all historical artifacts that tell us a lot about the
industry in which
they were made, the cultures that they were speaking to.'
Every Thursday, through March 25, four to five movies will be 'Reframed'
beginning at 8pm ET.
Good it's only through March 25, this could get old fast. I guess a
"full roundtable discussion" is going to take at least 15 min.
Some of those they mentioned I have no idea what could be "troubling and
problematic" about them but there must be something.
The fact that you have no idea how troubling and problematic they are
only goes to show how troubling and problematic they are. (Catch 222)
Miloch
2021-03-06 15:31:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by super70s
more at
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9330825/TCM-examine-18-
problematic-classic-movies-new-series.html
'I think there's something to be learned from any work of art,' Stewart said.
'They're all historical artifacts that tell us a lot about the industry
in which
they were made, the cultures that they were speaking to.'
Every Thursday, through March 25, four to five movies will be 'Reframed'
beginning at 8pm ET.
Good it's only through March 25, this could get old fast. I guess a
"full roundtable discussion" is going to take at least 15 min.
Some of those they mentioned I have no idea what could be "troubling
and problematic" about them but there must be something.
...next they'll be pulling 'Porky Pig' cartoons because it might insult those
with stuttering problems.



*
BTR1701
2021-03-08 00:46:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
Post by super70s
more at
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9330825/TCM-examine-18-
problematic-classic-movies-new-series.html
'I think there's something to be learned from any work of art,' Stewar
said.
'They're all historical artifacts that tell us a lot about the industry
in which
they were made, the cultures that they were speaking to.'
Every Thursday, through March 25, four to five movies will be 'Reframed'
beginning at 8pm ET.
Good it's only through March 25, this could get old fast. I guess a
"full roundtable discussion" is going to take at least 15 min.
Some of those they mentioned I have no idea what could be "troubling
and problematic" about them but there must be something.
...next they'll be pulling 'Porky Pig' cartoons because it might insult those
with stuttering problems.
Well, Pepe LePew is currently on the cancel chopping block, so you're not fa
off. They've already edited out Elmer Fudd's evil, evil shotgun from th
current version of Looney Toons.

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