Discussion:
Thoughts you won't like (3 ) Elizabeth Taylor
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Stephen DeMay
2017-05-09 17:21:08 UTC
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Holy molly, the grande dammme of Hollywood was a stinko actresss. Dull and phony as hell as a child star : Uber played unter results. As an adult much worse , everything she did was forced and forgetable except Who's Afraid in which she was great. One performance in a lifetime. Hollywood canteen soup has never been so watered down. I found her friendship with the cloroxed child molester Michael Jackson to be straaange.
Ralph
2017-05-10 17:17:06 UTC
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Holy molly, the grande dammme of Hollywood was a stinko actresss. Dull and phony as hell as a child star.
She was pretty good in “National Velvet,” “A Place in the Sun,” “Giant,” the
first half of “Raintree County,” very good in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,”
incredulously amusing in “Suddenly, Last Summer,” a knockout in the opening
twelve minutes of “BUtterfield 8”; a luscious set of tits in “Cleo”; a
surprisingly decent Katrina at the finale of “The Taming of the Shrew”; shows
off her often hidden gift for comedy (when penning misspelled invites to a
party) in “Reflections in a Golden Eye” and as a bitch galore spitting out
wonderful killer lines in “X, Y and Zee”; a generous co-star who gave “Between
Friends” to Carol Burnett, and is probably going to achieve a cult following
one day for John Waters’s love of her “droit du domaine” during which future
trashistas happily gobble up a retro schlockfest -- scenes from her assorted
Alexandre de Paris cracker factories like “BOOM,” “Secret Ceremony” and “The
Driver’s Seat.”
SLGreg
2017-05-10 17:33:29 UTC
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On Wed, 10 May 2017 10:17:06 -0700 (PDT), Ralph
Holy molly, the grande dammme of Hollywood was a stinko actresss. Dull and phony as hell as a child star.
She was pretty good in “National Velvet,” “A Place in the Sun,” “Giant,” the
first half of “Raintree County,” very good in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,”
incredulously amusing in “Suddenly, Last Summer,” a knockout in the opening
twelve minutes of “BUtterfield 8”; a luscious set of tits in “Cleo”; a
surprisingly decent Katrina at the finale of “The Taming of the Shrew”; shows
off her often hidden gift for comedy (when penning misspelled invites to a
party) in “Reflections in a Golden Eye” and as a bitch galore spitting out
wonderful killer lines in “X, Y and Zee”; a generous co-star who gave “Between
Friends” to Carol Burnett, and is probably going to achieve a cult following
one day for John Waters’s love of her “droit du domaine” during which future
trashistas happily gobble up a retro schlockfest -- scenes from her assorted
Alexandre de Paris cracker factories like “BOOM,” “Secret Ceremony” and “The
Driver’s Seat.”
I'm adding her Oscar winning role in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf."
Compare it to her "A Place in the Sun" debutante for a look at her
diverse range over the years.
--
- greg
moviePig
2017-05-10 17:34:58 UTC
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Post by Ralph
Holy molly, the grande dammme of Hollywood was a stinko actresss. Dull and phony as hell as a child star.
She was pretty good in “National Velvet,” “A Place in the Sun,” “Giant,” the
first half of “Raintree County,” very good in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,”
incredulously amusing in “Suddenly, Last Summer,” a knockout in the opening
twelve minutes of “BUtterfield 8”; a luscious set of tits in “Cleo”; a
surprisingly decent Katrina at the finale of “The Taming of the Shrew”; shows
off her often hidden gift for comedy (when penning misspelled invites to a
party) in “Reflections in a Golden Eye” and as a bitch galore spitting out
wonderful killer lines in “X, Y and Zee”; a generous co-star who gave “Between
Friends” to Carol Burnett, and is probably going to achieve a cult following
one day for John Waters’s love of her “droit du domaine” during which future
trashistas happily gobble up a retro schlockfest -- scenes from her assorted
Alexandre de Paris cracker factories like “BOOM,” “Secret Ceremony” and “The
Driver’s Seat.”
Maybe not her greatest acting, but you didn't mention WHO'S AFRAID OF
VIRGINIA WOOLF, which became memorable (a la Bette Davis's BABY JANE)
the instant she appeared in that middle-aged fright wig.
--
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YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
Ralph
2017-05-10 17:58:39 UTC
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Didn't mention "Virginia Woolf" because Stephen already did, and I thought it would be fair to mention stuff beyond the obvious.
moviePig
2017-05-10 18:19:27 UTC
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Post by Ralph
Didn't mention "Virginia Woolf" because Stephen already did, and I thought it would be fair to mention stuff beyond the obvious.
My bad. I'd better spring for that working memory-enlargement...
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
SLGreg
2017-05-10 18:27:00 UTC
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Post by moviePig
Post by Ralph
Didn't mention "Virginia Woolf" because Stephen already did, and I thought it would be fair to mention stuff beyond the obvious.
My bad. I'd better spring for that working memory-enlargement...
Mine, too. Make it two and just put it on my tab.
--
- greg
Stephen DeMay
2017-05-10 19:48:15 UTC
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Post by Ralph
Didn't mention "Virginia Woolf" because Stephen already did, and I thought it would be fair to mention stuff beyond the obvious.
I'm surprised you guys like her, to me she always seemed like a cousin or aunt who was supposed to be sexy and interesting but was just a cat. Her child actor performances impressed me as being like a finishing school approach to dialogue even in a medium in which polish is desireable. A good pairing with Roddy McDowell in that respect tho McDowell was fine in Legend of Hell House
SLGreg
2017-05-10 20:20:47 UTC
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On Wed, 10 May 2017 12:48:15 -0700 (PDT), Stephen DeMay
Post by Stephen DeMay
Post by Ralph
Didn't mention "Virginia Woolf" because Stephen already did, and I thought it would be fair to mention stuff beyond the obvious.
I'm surprised you guys like her, to me she always seemed like a cousin or aunt who was supposed to be sexy and interesting but was just a cat. Her child actor performances impressed me as being like a finishing school approach to dialogue even in a medium in which polish is desireable. A good pairing with Roddy McDowell in that respect tho McDowell was fine in Legend of Hell House
I always saw her as more of a beautiful, larger-than-life movie star
than an actress, although she played a couple of decent characters
along the way, she also starred in a shitload of stinkers.

When she'd haul out that snooty, finishing school affectation in her
voice, it really came off as something at a high school play level.
--
- greg
Ralph
2017-05-11 19:52:09 UTC
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Post by SLGreg
When she'd haul out that snooty, finishing school affectation in her
voice, it really came off as something at a high school play level.
You definitely have that right. And almost always in the bummers she made with
Burton. Too soon into “Boom” she capriciously shifts into one ridiculous accent
or to an emphatic affectation on words to feign an accent and almost always in
the same scene or sequence.

But then, as if by some unexplained alchemy, she revs up bitchery equal to the
intended verbalocity: on the sun-drenched terrace, issuing instructions about
the codeine, brandy and various newspapers she’ll need, and “g.d.”s both a
mobile and a shallow finger cut from an eye-popping ring, she then collides
into one of her servants and mini-climaxes with the supremely trashy
pleasure, “Shit on your mother!” After that she moves to one of Richard
MacDonald’s classy sitting areas and casually announces to her personal
assistant, “You know what I need to get me over this depression this summer,
what would do me more good than all the shots and pills in the pharmaceutical
kingdom? I need myself a lover.” The p.a. dumbfounds by responding she doesn’t
know what “lover” means -- she’s only had one man and that’s her husband -- and
clever Liz, ignoring the upchucky virtuousness, redeems the following: “Beats
me how you can have a husband named Charles and not call him Charley.” So
matter-of-factly hitting the stress point of mock in the two names that they
boomerang back at us. Damn if she doesn’t do great throwaway! (She’d also have
a go at the name “Bernard” and affectation in the fruit cake “Secret Ceremony.”)
Stephen DeMay
2017-05-11 20:55:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralph
Post by SLGreg
When she'd haul out that snooty, finishing school affectation in her
voice, it really came off as something at a high school play level.
You definitely have that right. And almost always in the bummers she made with
Burton. Too soon into “Boom” she capriciously shifts into one ridiculous accent
or to an emphatic affectation on words to feign an accent and almost always in
the same scene or sequence.
But then, as if by some unexplained alchemy, she revs up bitchery equal to the
intended verbalocity: on the sun-drenched terrace, issuing instructions about
the codeine, brandy and various newspapers she’ll need, and “g.d.”s both a
mobile and a shallow finger cut from an eye-popping ring, she then collides
into one of her servants and mini-climaxes with the supremely trashy
pleasure, “Shit on your mother!” After that she moves to one of Richard
MacDonald’s classy sitting areas and casually announces to her personal
assistant, “You know what I need to get me over this depression this summer,
what would do me more good than all the shots and pills in the pharmaceutical
kingdom? I need myself a lover.” The p.a. dumbfounds by responding she doesn’t
know what “lover” means -- she’s only had one man and that’s her husband -- and
clever Liz, ignoring the upchucky virtuousness, redeems the following: “Beats
me how you can have a husband named Charles and not call him Charley.” So
matter-of-factly hitting the stress point of mock in the two names that they
boomerang back at us. Damn if she doesn’t do great throwaway! (She’d also have
a go at the name “Bernard” and affectation in the fruit cake “Secret Ceremony.”)
You watched these movies full through ? To add to your collection please accept a rampf hard bark medal for fortitude.
Stephen DeMay
2017-05-11 21:24:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralph
Post by SLGreg
When she'd haul out that snooty, finishing school affectation in her
voice, it really came off as something at a high school play level.
You definitely have that right. And almost always in the bummers she made with
Burton. Too soon into “Boom” she capriciously shifts into one ridiculous accent
or to an emphatic affectation on words to feign an accent and almost always in
the same scene or sequence.
But then, as if by some unexplained alchemy, she revs up bitchery equal to the
intended verbalocity: on the sun-drenched terrace, issuing instructions about
the codeine, brandy and various newspapers she’ll need, and “g.d.”s both a
mobile and a shallow finger cut from an eye-popping ring, she then collides
into one of her servants and mini-climaxes with the supremely trashy
pleasure, “Shit on your mother!” After that she moves to one of Richard
MacDonald’s classy sitting areas and casually announces to her personal
assistant, “You know what I need to get me over this depression this summer,
what would do me more good than all the shots and pills in the pharmaceutical
kingdom? I need myself a lover.” The p.a. dumbfounds by responding she doesn’t
know what “lover” means -- she’s only had one man and that’s her husband -- and
clever Liz, ignoring the upchucky virtuousness, redeems the following: “Beats
me how you can have a husband named Charles and not call him Charley.” So
matter-of-factly hitting the stress point of mock in the two names that they
boomerang back at us. Damn if she doesn’t do great throwaway! (She’d also have
a go at the name “Bernard” and affectation in the fruit cake “Secret Ceremony.”)
Can all these precious moments be encapsulated in my assessment of her being " catty " ? any way the chances of my watching Taylor ham in any more of her histrionics would be akin to Stymie's " I ain't washing my feet for noooobody". We could be the Siskel and Ebert for a new generation of review show.
Stephen DeMay
2017-05-11 21:32:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralph
Post by SLGreg
When she'd haul out that snooty, finishing school affectation in her
voice, it really came off as something at a high school play level.
You definitely have that right. And almost always in the bummers she made with
Burton. Too soon into “Boom” she capriciously shifts into one ridiculous accent
or to an emphatic affectation on words to feign an accent and almost always in
the same scene or sequence.
But then, as if by some unexplained alchemy, she revs up bitchery equal to the
intended verbalocity: on the sun-drenched terrace, issuing instructions about
the codeine, brandy and various newspapers she’ll need, and “g.d.”s both a
mobile and a shallow finger cut from an eye-popping ring, she then collides
into one of her servants and mini-climaxes with the supremely trashy
pleasure, “Shit on your mother!” After that she moves to one of Richard
MacDonald’s classy sitting areas and casually announces to her personal
assistant, “You know what I need to get me over this depression this summer,
what would do me more good than all the shots and pills in the pharmaceutical
kingdom? I need myself a lover.” The p.a. dumbfounds by responding she doesn’t
know what “lover” means -- she’s only had one man and that’s her husband -- and
clever Liz, ignoring the upchucky virtuousness, redeems the following: “Beats
me how you can have a husband named Charles and not call him Charley.” So
matter-of-factly hitting the stress point of mock in the two names that they
boomerang back at us. Damn if she doesn’t do great throwaway! (She’d also have
a go at the name “Bernard” and affectation in the fruit cake “Secret Ceremony.”)
Is Ralph a new boy around here ? Sure can turn a phrase and with such an easy target as the Queen B (for bitch) he's good at turning the screws. Sign him up
Stephen DeMay
2017-05-11 23:38:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralph
Post by SLGreg
When she'd haul out that snooty, finishing school affectation in her
voice, it really came off as something at a high school play level.
You definitely have that right. And almost always in the bummers she made with
Burton. Too soon into “Boom” she capriciously shifts into one ridiculous accent
or to an emphatic affectation on words to feign an accent and almost always in
the same scene or sequence.
But then, as if by some unexplained alchemy, she revs up bitchery equal to the
intended verbalocity: on the sun-drenched terrace, issuing instructions about
the codeine, brandy and various newspapers she’ll need, and “g.d.”s both a
mobile and a shallow finger cut from an eye-popping ring, she then collides
into one of her servants and mini-climaxes with the supremely trashy
pleasure, “Shit on your mother!” After that she moves to one of Richard
MacDonald’s classy sitting areas and casually announces to her personal
assistant, “You know what I need to get me over this depression this summer,
what would do me more good than all the shots and pills in the pharmaceutical
kingdom? I need myself a lover.” The p.a. dumbfounds by responding she doesn’t
know what “lover” means -- she’s only had one man and that’s her husband -- and
clever Liz, ignoring the upchucky virtuousness, redeems the following: “Beats
me how you can have a husband named Charles and not call him Charley.” So
matter-of-factly hitting the stress point of mock in the two names that they
boomerang back at us. Damn if she doesn’t do great throwaway! (She’d also have
a go at the name “Bernard” and affectation in the fruit cake “Secret Ceremony.”)
You have created a mental picture of Boom, but as I wrote in response to another of your reviews... Is it accurate ? Elizabeth sounds like a bigger than life character who creates energy, the force if you will, in everything around her. There is no "too small to matter " in her world. Or she can be seen as Sherlock Holmes without a case, a sad figure who employs bravado to mask her insecurities. Maybe she's into Charlie the Tuna but the audience does not get it. Her wish for a lover may be code for a desire to bring more Elizabeths or Richards into the world. A true affirmation of life. Or maybe she 's taking dull material and having a comedic ball with it thinking " as long as they pick it up I'll keep laying it down." There could be hidden depths here.
Stephen DeMay
2017-05-12 22:37:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen DeMay
Post by Ralph
Post by SLGreg
When she'd haul out that snooty, finishing school affectation in her
voice, it really came off as something at a high school play level.
You definitely have that right. And almost always in the bummers she made with
Burton. Too soon into “Boom” she capriciously shifts into one ridiculous accent
or to an emphatic affectation on words to feign an accent and almost always in
the same scene or sequence.
But then, as if by some unexplained alchemy, she revs up bitchery equal to the
intended verbalocity: on the sun-drenched terrace, issuing instructions about
the codeine, brandy and various newspapers she’ll need, and “g.d.”s both a
mobile and a shallow finger cut from an eye-popping ring, she then collides
into one of her servants and mini-climaxes with the supremely trashy
pleasure, “Shit on your mother!” After that she moves to one of Richard
MacDonald’s classy sitting areas and casually announces to her personal
assistant, “You know what I need to get me over this depression this summer,
what would do me more good than all the shots and pills in the pharmaceutical
kingdom? I need myself a lover.” The p.a. dumbfounds by responding she doesn’t
know what “lover” means -- she’s only had one man and that’s her husband -- and
clever Liz, ignoring the upchucky virtuousness, redeems the following: “Beats
me how you can have a husband named Charles and not call him Charley.” So
matter-of-factly hitting the stress point of mock in the two names that they
boomerang back at us. Damn if she doesn’t do great throwaway! (She’d also have
a go at the name “Bernard” and affectation in the fruit cake “Secret Ceremony.”)
You have created a mental picture of Boom, but as I wrote in response to another of your reviews... Is it accurate ? Elizabeth sounds like a bigger than life character who creates energy, the force if you will, in everything around her. There is no "too small to matter " in her world. Or she can be seen as Sherlock Holmes without a case, a sad figure who employs bravado to mask her insecurities. Maybe she's into Charlie the Tuna but the audience does not get it. Her wish for a lover may be code for a desire to bring more Elizabeths or Richards into the world. A true affirmation of life. Or maybe she 's taking dull material and having a comedic ball with it thinking " as long as they pick it up I'll keep laying it down." There could be hidden depths here.
Although this is a satirical post in response to a satirical post it can be, I believe, an example of how flights of fancy can be attached to films and pass for insight. Critics who posses more skill in form than in content can flesh out what's on the screen to their taste or go off on tangents that have little , if anything, to do with a screenplay. As an example take Bergman's The Silent Spring ( I've seen a number of his works in theaters when they were released ) : it is as flat as can be imagined yet is highly regarded by the " elite " of writers on Cinema. The screenplay could not be any simpler, there just isn't any there there. Most all of the stories collected by the Grimm brothers and their associates are perhaps gruesome but they lack psychological underpinning... yet they are valued by the literati I believe in plain speaking and the what you see is what you get school of thought. That has never been in fashion.
gggg gggg
2021-08-01 15:36:46 UTC
Permalink
Holy molly, the grande dammme of Hollywood was a stinko actresss. Dull and phony as hell as a child star : Uber played unter results. As an adult much worse , everything she did was forced and forgetable except Who's Afraid in which she was great. One performance in a lifetime. Hollywood canteen soup has never been so watered down. I found her friendship with the cloroxed child molester Michael Jackson to be straaange.
(Youtube upload):

When Movies Were Good, Episode 3: Elizabeth Taylor

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